Feud meaning

fyo͝od
Land held from a feudal lord in return for service; fief.
noun
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A bitter, often prolonged quarrel or state of enmity, especially such a state of hostilities between two families or clans.
noun
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1
The definition of a feud is a prolonged bitter disagreement or fight between families, family members or friends.

An example of a feud is parents not speaking to their daughter for many years because she married someone outside of the family's religion.

noun
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Any dispute or rivalry, esp. when bitter or protracted.
noun
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1
To carry on a feud; quarrel.
verb
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A state of long-standing mutual hostility.

You couldn't call it a feud exactly, but there had always been a chill between Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods.

noun
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(professional wrestling slang) A staged rivalry between wrestlers.
noun
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(intransitive) To carry on a feud.

The two men began to feud after one of them got a job promotion and the other thought he was more qualified.

verb
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An estate granted to a vassal by a feudal lord in exchange for service.
noun
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To carry on or perpetuate a bitter quarrel or state of enmity.
verb
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A bitter, protracted, and violent quarrel, esp. between clans or families, often characterized by killings and counterkillings.
noun
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Origin of feud

  • Alteration (probably influenced by feud) of Middle English fede from Old French faide of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Medieval Latin feudum of Germanic origin peku- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fede, feide, *feithe, from Old English fǣhþ, fǣhþu, fǣhþo (“hostility, enmity, violence, revenge, vendetta”), from Proto-Germanic *faihiþō (“hatred, enmity”), from Proto-Indo-European *pAik-, *pAig- (“ill-meaning, wicked”), equivalent to foe +‎ -th. Cognate with Dutch veete (“feud”), German Fehde (“feud, vendetta”), Danish fejde (“feud, enmity, hostility, war”), Swedish fejd (“feud, controversy, quarrel, strife”), and Old French faide, feide (“feud”), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Related to foe, fiend.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old French, from Latin feodum.

    From Wiktionary