Fray meaning

frā
A military engagement; a battle.
noun
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0
To become worn away or tattered along the edges.
verb
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1

Though they did not know the reason for the dispute, they did not hesitate to leap into the fray.

noun
5
2
(archaic) Fright.
noun
4
1
(intransitive) To unravel; used particularly for the edge of something made of cloth, or the end of a rope.

The ribbon frayed at the cut end.

verb
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A fight; a brawl.
noun
1
1
A heated dispute or intensely competitive situation.
noun
1
1
(intransitive, figuratively) To cause exhaustion, wear out (a person's mental strength).

The stressful day ended in frayed nerves. (Metaphorical use; nerves are visualised as strings)

verb
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(archaic) Frighten; alarm.

verb
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To alarm; frighten.
verb
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1
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To drive away.
verb
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1
To strain; chafe.

Repeated noises that fray the nerves.

verb
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1
To wear away (the edges of fabric, for example) by rubbing.
verb
0
1
A frayed or threadbare spot, as on fabric.
noun
0
1
A noisy quarrel or fight; brawl.
noun
0
1
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(archaic) To frighten.
verb
0
1
To make or become worn, ragged, or raveled by rubbing.
verb
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1
To make or become weakened or strained.
verb
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1
A frayed place, as in cloth.
noun
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1
To bear the expense of; to defray.
verb
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1
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(intransitive) To rub.
verb
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1
To fray is defined as when something becomes worn or unraveled, especially cloth.

An example of to fray is playing with the end of a sweater while nervous.

verb
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2
To fray means to become irritated.

An example of to fray is drumming on the table in front of someone who dislikes that sound.

verb
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2
Fray is defined as a noisy struggle or fight.

An example of a fray is a family argument.

noun
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2

Origin of fray

  • Middle English fraien to wear, bruise from Old French fraier to rub from Latin fricāre

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English frai shortening of affrai affray

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English fraien, from Old French frayer, from Latin fricāre, present active infinitive of fricō.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English frai, aphetic variant of affray.

    From Wiktionary