Fright definition

frīt
Frequency:
(archaic) To frighten; terrify.
verb
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Sudden intense fear, as of something immediately threatening.
noun
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2
Sudden fear or terror; alarm.
noun
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(informal) Something extremely unsightly, alarming, or strange.

Brush your hair; you look a fright.

noun
5
1
To frighten.
verb
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An ugly, ridiculous, startling, or unusual person or thing.
noun
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Fright is defined as sudden fear or apprehension, or is a person who looks startling or ridiculous.

A ghost that causes you to feel extremely scared is an example of a fright.

A person who is messy, wearing unkempt and mismatched clothes with unbrushed hair is an example of someone who looks a fright.

A feeling of terror you get when you see a ghost is an example of fright.

noun
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A state of terror excited by the sudden appearance of danger; sudden and violent fear, usually of short duration; a sudden alarm.
noun
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Anything strange, ugly or shocking, producing a feeling of alarm or aversion.
noun
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(archaic) To frighten.
verb
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
fright
Plural:
frights

Origin of fright

  • Middle English from Old English fyrhto, fryhto V., from Middle English frighten to frighten, be afraid from Old English fyrhtan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Cognate with Scots fricht (“fright”), Old Frisian fruchte (“fright”), Low German frucht (“fright”), Middle Dutch vrucht, German Furcht (“fear, fright”), Danish frygt (“fear”), Swedish fruktan (“fear, fright, dread”), Gothic (faurhtei, “fear, horror, fright”). Albanian frikë (“fear, fright, dread, danger”) and Romanian frică (“fear, fright, dread”) are also cognates, although probably influenced by an early Germanic variant.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English fright, furht, from Old English fryhtu, fyrhto (“fright, fear, dread, trembling, horrible sight”), from Proto-Germanic *furhtį̄ (“fear”), from Proto-Indo-European *perg- (“to frighten; fear”).

    From Wiktionary