Panic definition

pănĭk
(slang) To convulse (a listener, audience, etc.) with laughter, delight, etc.
verb
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3
Panic means to cause sudden fear or to experience sudden fear.

An example of to panic is to become quickly frightened when in a small space.

verb
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0
To affect or be affected with panic.
verb
5
2
Of or resulting from a financial panic.

Panic selling of securities.

adjective
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Having the nature of, or showing or resulting from, panic.
adjective
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The definition of panic is showing sudden fear.

An example of panic used as an adjective is a panic situation which means a situation that suddenly causes many people to become terrified.

adjective
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(slang) A person or thing considered extremely humorous or entertaining.
noun
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A widespread and significant fear that the market or economy is going to collapse. A panic leads to massive bank deposit withdrawals and possible banking collapses, as well as falling stock prices. Panics occurred at the height of the Great Depression in the U.S. when bank depositors by the hundreds descended on their banks to withdraw their deposits for fear that the bank would fail and they would lose all of their money. A panic is usually a relatively short-lived phenomenon, in contrast to a recession or depression, which last six months to several years.
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Relating to or resulting from sudden, overwhelming terror.

Panic flight.

adjective
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1
Panic is sudden overpowering fear, often affecting large numbers of people all at once.

An example of panic is suddenly becoming terrified of being in a small space.

An example of panic is when many investors sell a particular stock after hearing news that could potentially be bad for the company.

noun
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(slang) A person or thing that is considered extremely funny.
noun
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A state of frantic activity, usually accompanied by extreme concern or anxiety.

The office was in a panic as the deadline approached.

noun
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A sudden widespread alarm concerning finances, often resulting in a rush to sell property to raise cash.
noun
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Of, relating to, or resulting from sudden, overwhelming terror.

Panic flight.

adjective
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(mythology) Of or relating to Pan.
adjective
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To affect or be affected with panic.
verb
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Any of several grasses (genus Panicum), as millet, used as fodder.
noun
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(literally) Of Pan.
adjective
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Of sudden fear, as supposedly inspired by Pan.
adjective
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A widespread fear of the collapse of the financial system, resulting in unreasoned attempts to turn property into cash, withdraw money, etc.
noun
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To affect with panic.
verb
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To give way to or show panic.
verb
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A sudden, overpowering feeling of fear, often affecting many people at once.
noun
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A state of extreme anxiety, such as that involved in a panic attack.
noun
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Of fear, fright etc: sudden or overwhelming (attributed by the ancient Greeks to the influence of Pan).
adjective
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Overpowering fright, often affecting groups of people or animals.
noun
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(finance, economics) Rapid reduction in asset prices due to broad efforts to raise cash in anticipation of continuing decline in asset prices.
noun
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verb
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(botany) A plant of the genus Panicum.
noun
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adjective
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A state of extreme anxiety, such as that involved in a panic attack.
noun
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2
A sudden, overpowering feeling of fear, often affecting many people at once.
noun
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1
A sudden, unreasoning, hysterical fear, often spreading quickly.
noun
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1
(now rare) Pertaining to the god Pan.
adjective
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1
push the panic button
  • to panic; specif., to react to a crisis with some frantic, often disastrous action
idiom
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
panic
Plural:
panics

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

push the panic button

Origin of panic

  • From French panique terrified from Greek Pānikos of Pan (a source of terror, as in flocks or herds), groundless (used of fear) from Pān Pan Pan

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French panique, from Ancient Greek πανικός (panikos, “pertaining to Pan"), from Πάν (Pan, “Pan"). Pan is the god of woods and fields who was the source of mysterious sounds that caused contagious, groundless fear in herds and crowds, or in people in lonely spots.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Wiktionary