Excise meaning

ĕk'sīz'
To excise is defined as to cut out surgically.

When a tumor is surgically cut out, this is an example of excise.

verb
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Excise is defined as a tax charged on certain items or goods.

A tax charged on cigarettes is an example of an excise tax.

noun
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An internal tax imposed on the production, sale, or consumption of a commodity or the use of a service within a country.

Excises on tobacco, liquor, and long-distance telephone calls.

noun
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A licensing charge or a fee levied for certain privileges.
noun
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To levy an excise on.
verb
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To remove by or as if by cutting.

Excised the tumor; excised two scenes from the film.

verb
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A tax or duty on the manufacture, sale, or consumption of various commodities, as liquor or tobacco, within a country.
noun
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A fee paid for a license to carry on certain occupations, sports, etc.
noun
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To put an excise on.
verb
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To cut out or away; specif., to remove (a tumor, organ, etc.) surgically.
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To remove by cutting.
verb
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A tax on income-producing activities or on actions involving goods, such as their manufacture or sale.
noun
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A tax charged on goods produced within the country (as opposed to customs duties, charged on goods from outside the country).
noun
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To impose an excise tax on something.
verb
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To cut out; to remove.
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(rare) To perform certain types of female circumcision.
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Origin of excise

  • Middle Dutch excijs alteration (influenced by Latin excīsus) (past participle of excīdere to cut out) of accijs tax probably from Old French acceis partly from Vulgar Latin accēnsum (Latin ad- ad-) (Latin cēnsus tax census) and partly from Old French assise legislative ordinance assize
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Latin excīdere excīs- ex- ex- caedere to cut kaə-id- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle Dutch excijs, altered under the influence of Latin excisus (“cut out, removed”), from earlier accijs (“tax”), from Old French acceis (“tax, assessment”) (whence modern French accise), from Vulgar Latin *accensum, ultimately from Latin ad + census (“tax, census”).
    From Wiktionary
  • From French exciser, from Latin excisus, past participle of excīdō (“cut out”), from ex (“out of, from”) + caedō (“cut”).
    From Wiktionary