Doom meaning

do͝om
Frequency:
Inevitable destruction or ruin.

A tyrant who finally met his doom.

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A decision or judgment, especially an official condemnation to a severe penalty.
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Judgment Day.
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A statute or ordinance, especially one in force in Anglo-Saxon England.
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To condemn to ruination or death.
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(historical) A statute; decree.
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A judgment; esp., a sentence of condemnation.
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Destiny; fate.
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Tragic fate; ruin or death.
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Judgment Day.
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To pronounce judgment on; condemn; sentence.
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To destine to a tragic fate.
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To ordain as a penalty.
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(countable, historical) A law.
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(countable, historical) A judgment or decision.
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(countable, historical) A sentence or penalty for an illegality or type of illegality.
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They met an untimely doom when the mineshaft caved in.

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Destiny, especially terrible.
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An ill fate; an impending severe occurrence or danger that seems inevitable.
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A feeling of danger, impending danger, darkness or despair.
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To pronounce sentence or judgment on; to condemn.

A criminal doomed to death.

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To destine; to fix irrevocably the ill fate of.
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(archaic, US, New England) To assess a tax upon, by estimate or at discretion.

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(video games, trademark) A popular first-person shooter video game, often regarded as the father of the genre.
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Doom is defined as a sentence of blame, destiny or fate.

An example of doom is someone driving into a tornado and being killed.

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To cause to come to an inevitable bad end; destine to end badly.
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(sometimes capitalized) The Last Judgment; or, an artistic representation of it.
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Origin of doom

  • Middle English dom from Old English dōm judgment dhē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dome, dom, from Old English dōm (“judgement”), from Proto-Germanic *dōmaz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰóh₁mos. Compare West Frisian doem, Dutch doem, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish dom, Icelandic dómur. See also deem.

    From Wiktionary

  • doom

    From Wiktionary