Dialogue meaning

dīə-lôg, -lŏg
To engage in a dialogue.
verb
11
4
A talking together; conversation.
noun
9
3
A literary work in the form of a conversation on a single topic.
noun
8
3
To express in dialogue.
verb
6
2
Interchange and discussion of ideas, esp. when open and frank, as in seeking mutual understanding or harmony.
noun
5
2
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To hold a conversation.
verb
3
3
A conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals.

Bill and Melinda maintained a dialogue via email over the course of their long-distance relationship.

noun
1
0
The passages of talk in a play, story, etc.
noun
1
1
The definition of dialogue is conversation, or an exchange of ideas.

An example of dialogue is two people talking with one another.

noun
1
4
In a dramatic or literary presentation, the verbal parts of the script or text; the verbalizations of the actors or characters.

The movie had great special effects, but the dialogue was lackluster.

noun
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4
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A literary form, where the presentation resembles a conversation.

A literary historian, she specialized in the dialogues of ancient Greek philosophers.

noun
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0
(computing) A dialogue box.

Once the My Computer dialogue opens, select Local Disk (C:), then right click and scroll down.

noun
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0
(informal, business) To discuss or negotiate so that all parties can reach an understanding.

Pearson wanted to dialogue with his overseas counterparts about the new reporting requirements.

verb
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A literary work written in the form of a conversation.

The dialogues of Plato.

noun
0
1
(music) A composition or passage for two or more parts, suggestive of conversational interplay.
noun
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1
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To express as or in a dialogue.

Dialogued parts of the story.

verb
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1

Origin of dialogue

  • Middle English dialog from Old French dialogue from Latin dialogus from Greek dialogos conversation from dialegesthai to discuss dialect

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French dialoge (French dialogue), from Late Latin dialogus, from Ancient Greek διάλογος (dialogos, “conversation, discourse”), from διά (dia, “through, inter”) + λόγος (logos, “speech, oration, discourse”), from διαλέγομαι (dialegomai, “to converse”), from διά (dia) + λέγειν (legein, “to speak”).

    From Wiktionary