Dialog meaning

dīə-lôg, -lŏg
Dialog, also spelled dialogue, is defined as a conversation.

An example of dialog is two people talking to each other.

noun
0
0
noun
0
0
(Dialog, A Thomson Corporation business, Cary, NC, www.dialog.com). The first commercial online information retrieval system, created by Roger Summit in 1967 and launched as a service in 1972. For years, DIALOG has offered the largest single collection of information available online, claiming over 900 databases in areas such as business, science, finance and law. Searching is free, but there are fees for viewing the results. Access is available via the Web or by separate dial-up numbers as was the norm before the Internet became popular. DIALOG's searchable content is considered to be part of the deep Web.
0
0
A conversation or other form of discourse between two or more individuals.

noun
0
0
In a dramatic or literary presentation, the verbal parts of the script or text; the verbalizations of the actors or characters.

noun
0
0
Advertisement
A literary form, where the presentation resembles a conversation.

1475, Higden's Polychronicon: Seynte Aldelme returnyde to Briteyne..makenge mony noble bookes ... of the rewles of feete metricalle, of metaplasmus, of dialog metricalle.

noun
0
0
(computing) A dialog box.

noun
0
0
(informal, business) To discuss or negotiate so that all parties can reach an understanding.
verb
0
0
Dialog is defined as to talk back and forth with someone.

An example of dialog is chatting with a friend on the phone.

verb
0
1

Origin of dialog

  • From Middle English dialog (“A literary talk, literary composition in dialog form; dialogus, the Dialogues of Pope Gregory the Great; a conversation”), from Ancient Greek διάλογος (dialogos, “conversation, discourse”), from διά (dia, “through, inter”) + λόγος (logos, “speech, oration, discourse”), from διαλέγομαι (dialegomai, “to converse”), from διά (dia) + λέγειν (legein, “to speak”).

    From Wiktionary