Conscience meaning

kŏn'shəns
Consciousness or awareness of something.
noun
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The moral sense of right and wrong, chiefly as it affects one's own behaviour; inwit.
noun
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The definition of conscience is a personal awareness of right and wrong that you use to guide your actions to do right.

An example of conscience is the personal ethics that keep you from cheating on an exam.

noun
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A knowledge or sense of right and wrong, with an urge to do right; moral judgment that opposes the violation of a previously recognized ethical principle and that leads to feelings of guilt if one violates such a principle.
noun
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(chiefly fiction) A personification of the moral sense of right and wrong, usually in the form of a person, a being or merely a voice that gives moral lessons and advices.
noun
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The part of the superego in psychoanalysis that judges the ethical nature of one's actions and thoughts and then transmits such determinations to the ego for consideration.
noun
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The part of the superego in psychoanalysis that judges the ethical nature of one's actions and thoughts and then transmits such determinations to the ego for consideration.
noun
0
1
in (all good) conscience
  • In all fairness; by any reasonable standard.
idiom
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on (one's) conscience
  • Causing one to feel guilty or uneasy.
idiom
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in (all) conscience
  • In fairness; on any reasonable ground.
idiom
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0
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on one's conscience
  • Causing one to feel guilty.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

in (all good) conscience
on (one's) conscience
in (all) conscience
on one's conscience

Origin of conscience

  • Middle English from Old French from Latin cōnscientia from cōnsciēns cōnscient- present participle of cōnscīre to be conscious of com- intensive pref. com– scīre to know skei- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Old French conscience, from Latin conscientia (“knowledge within oneself”), from consciens, present participle of conscire (“to know, to be conscious (of wrong)”), from com- (“together”) + scire (“to know”).
    From Wiktionary