Salvo meaning

sălvō
Something resembling a release or discharge of bombs or firearms, as:
  • A sudden outburst, as of cheers or praise.
  • A forceful verbal or written assault.
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A mental provision or reservation.
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An expedient for protecting one's reputation or for soothing one's conscience.
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A discharge of a number of pieces of artillery or small arms, in regular succession or at the same time, either as a salute or, esp. in naval battles, as a broadside.
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The release of a load of bombs or the launching of several rockets at the same time.
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A burst of cheers or applause.
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(law) A saving clause; reservation.
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They admit many salvos, cautions, and reservations. --Eikon Basilike.

2006 MetaFilter community weblog Britannica's issued a salvo against Nature's famous "Wikipedia and the EB are comparably error-strewn" analysis.

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(military) A concentrated fire from pieces of artillery, as in endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.
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By extension, any volley, as in an argument or debate.
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A salute paid by a simultaneous, or nearly simultaneous, firing of a number of cannon.
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Origin of salvo

  • Italian salva from French salve from Latin salvē hail imperative of salvēre to be in good health from salvus safe sol- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin salvō (as in Medieval Latin salvō iūre saving the right) ablative of salvus safe safe

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • A 1719 alteration of salva (1591) "simultaneous discharge of guns," from Latin salva (“salute, volley") (compare salve, also from Italian), from Latin salve (“hail"), imperative of salvere: "be in good health!," the usual Roman greeting, regarded as imperative of salvere "to be in good health,"

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin salvo, ablative of salvus, the past participle of salvāre (“to save, to reserve"), either from salvo jure literally 'the right being reserved', or from salvo errore et omissone 'reserving error and omission'.

    From Wiktionary