Confection meaning

kən-fĕk'shən
The act or process of confecting or the result of it.
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To make into a confection.
verb
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A sweet preparation, such as candy.
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A sweetened medicinal compound; an electuary.
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A piece displaying splendid craft, skill, and work.

The gown was a confection of satin and appliqué.

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The act or process of confecting.
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Any kind of candy or other sweet preparation, such as ice cream or preserves.
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A sweetened mixture of drugs; electuary.
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A product or work having a frivolous, whimsical, or contrived effect.
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A fancy, stylish article of women's clothing.
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To prepare as a confection.
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A food item prepared very sweet, frequently decorated in fine detail, and often preserved with sugar, such as a candy, sweetmeat, fruit preserve, pastry, cake or the like.

The table was covered with all sorts of tempting confections.

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The act or process of confecting; the process of making, compounding, or preparing something.
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The result of such a process; something made up or confected; a concoction.

The defense attorney maintained that the charges were a confection of the local police.

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(dated) An artistic, musical, or literary work taken as frivolous, amusing, or contrived; a composition of a light nature.
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(dated) Something, such as a garment or a decoration, seen as very elaborate, delicate, or luxurious, usually also seen as impractical or non-utilitarian.
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(pharmacology) A preparation of medicine sweetened with sugar, honey, syrup, or the like; an electuary.
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To make into a confection, prepare as a confection.
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Origin of confection

  • Middle English confescioun, from Old French confeccion (French confection), from Latin confectionem (nominative confectio), from confectus, past participle of conficere (“to prepare”), from com- (“with”) + facere (“to make, do”). Originally "the making by means of ingredients"; sense of "candy or light pastry" predominant since 1500's.
    From Wiktionary