Actual meaning

ăkcho͝o-əl
Existing at present or at the time.
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Conforming to the characteristics of a group or type; typical.

Is he an actual doctor or a fake?

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Existing in reality or in fact; not merely possible, but real; as it really is.

The actual cost of the dam.

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Existing in act or reality, not just potentially; really acted or acting; occurring in fact.

The actual cost of goods; the actual case under discussion.

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Real or existing in fact as opposed to being assumed or deemed to have happened or exist. See also apparent and constructive.
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Factual, real, not just apparent or even false.

The actual government expenses dramatically exceed the budget.

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(dated) In action at the time being; now existing; current.

The actual situation of the world economy is worse than anyone expected a year ago.

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Jeremy Taylor.

Let your holy and pious intention be actual; that is […] by a special prayer or action, […] given to God.

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Used to emphasise a noun or verb, whether something is real or metaphorical.
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An actual, real one; notably:
  • (finance) Something actually received; real receipts, as distinct from estimated ones.
  • (military) A radio callsign modifier that specifies the commanding officer of the unit or asset denoted by the remainder of the callsign and not the officer's assistant or other designee.

"Bravo Six Actual, Snakebite leader" (The person with the callsign "Snakebite leader" requests to speak to the commander of company Bravo and not the radio operator.)

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The definition of actual is existing now or real.

Albany is the capital of New York is an example of an actual bit of information.

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Origin of actual

  • Middle English from Old French active from Late Latin āctuālis from Latin āctus past participle of agere to drive, do ag- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English actual, actuel (“active”), from Old French actuel, actual, from Late Latin actualis (“active, practical”), from Latin actus (“act, action, performance”), from agere (“to do; to act”) + -alis (“-al”).

    From Wiktionary