Absurd definition

əb-sûrd, -zûrd
So clearly untrue or unreasonable as to be laughable or ridiculous.
adjective
21
11
Of, relating to, or manifesting the view that there is no order or meaning in human life or in the universe.
adjective
18
15
The condition or state in which humans exist in an absurd universe, without meaning or purpose. Used chiefly with the.
noun
10
8
Impossible to take seriously; silly.

A character who goes through many absurd adventures.

adjective
3
1
Contrary to reason or propriety; obviously and flatly opposed to manifest truth; inconsistent with the plain dictates of common sense; logically contradictory; nonsensical; ridiculous; silly. [First attested in the mid 16th century.]
adjective
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1
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Dealing with absurdism.
adjective
1
1
(philosophy) The opposition between the human search for meaning in life and the inability to find any; the state or condition in which man exists in an irrational universe and his life has no meaning outside of his existence. [First attested in the early 20th century.]
noun
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0
Of or relating to absurdism.
adjective
0
1
Having no rational or orderly relationship to people's lives; meaningless; lacking order or value.
adjective
0
1
The definition of absurd is something that is so untrue or impossible it is funny.

An example of absurd is a child telling a story about a dinosaur eating their homework.

adjective
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Extremely unreasonable, incongruous, or inappropriate.

An absurd request.

adjective
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2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
absurd
Plural:
absurds

Adjective

Base Form:
absurd
Comparative:
absurder
Superlative:
absurdest

Origin of absurd

  • Latin absurdus out of tune, absurd ab- intensive pref. ab–1 surdus deaf, muffled

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • First attested in 1557. From Middle French absurde, from Latin absurdus (“incongruous, dissonant, out of tune”), from ab (“away from, out”) + surdus (“silent, deaf, dull-sounding”). Compare surd.

    From Wiktionary