Wrack meaning

răk
Wrack is seaweed that is placed on the shore by the waves, or a shipwreck or other wreckage.

Course brown seaweed laying along the beach is an example of wrack.

The sunken remains of the Titanic are an example of wrack.

noun
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To cause the ruin of; wreck.
verb
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To be wrecked.
verb
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Destruction; ruin.
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A wrecked ship.
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Seaweed or other marine plant life cast up on shore.
noun
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To wreck or be wrecked.
verb
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  • To subject to extreme mental or physical suffering; torture.
  • To disturb violently; convulse.
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A rack of clouds or other vapor.
noun
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(archaic, dialectal or literary) Vengeance; revenge; persecution; punishment; consequence; trouble.
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(archaic, except in dialects) Ruin; destruction.
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The remains; a wreck.
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(UK dialectal) To execute vengeance; avenge.
verb
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(UK dialectal) To worry; tease; torment.
verb
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(archaic) Remnant from a shipwreck as washed ashore, or the right to claim such items.
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Any marine vegetation cast up on shore, especially seaweed of the genus Fucus.
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Weeds, vegetation or rubbish floating on a river or pond.
noun
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A high flying cloud; a rack.
noun
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To wreck, especially a ship (usually in passive).
verb
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Alternative form of rack, To cause to suffer pain, etc.
verb
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Destruction or ruin. Used chiefly in the phrase wrack and ruin.
noun
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wrack (one's) brains
  • To try hard to remember or think of something.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of wrack

  • Middle English from Old English wræc punishment (influenced by Middle Dutch wrak shipwreck)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English wrak from Middle Dutch
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Influenced by wrack
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle Dutch (Dutch) wrak (cognate with German Wrack, Old Norse rek, Danish vrag, Swedish vrak, Old English wræc). Compare Gothic 𐍅𐍂𐌹𐌺𐌰𐌽 (wrikan), 𐍅𐍂𐌰𐌺𐌾𐌰𐌽 (wrakjan, “persecute"), Old Norse reka (“drive").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English wrake, wrache, wreche, from a merger of Old English wracu, wræc (“misery, suffering") and Old English wrǣċ (“vengeance, revenge").
    From Wiktionary