Warn meaning

wôrn
To tell (a person) of a danger, coming evil, misfortune, etc.; put on guard; caution.
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To notify in advance; inform.
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Warn is defined as to tell or caution against danger.

An example of warn is to tell someone that there is a slippery road ahead.

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To notify or make aware in advance of something, especially of possible danger or misfortune.

Warned boaters of the coming storm; warned me that they might be delayed.

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To make known (a warning).

Warned that the bolts needed to be replaced.

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To advise or caution (someone) about a course of action.

Warned us to be careful; warned us not to stay up too late.

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To notify (a person) to go or stay away.

The ranger warned hikers away from the cliff.

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To caution about certain acts; admonish.

Warned against smoking in the building.

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To give notice to (a person) to stay or keep (off, away, etc.)
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To give warning.
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To make (someone) aware of impending danger etc. [from 11th c.]

We waved a flag to warn the oncoming traffic.

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To caution (someone) against unwise or unacceptable behaviour. [from 11th c.]

He was warned against crossing the railway tracks at night.

Don't let me catch you running in the corridor again, I warn you.

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To notify (someone) of something untoward. [from 13th c.]

I phoned to warn him of the rail strike.

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(intransitive) To give warning.
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(obsolete) To refuse, deny (someone something).
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Origin of warn

  • Middle English warnen from Old English warnian wer-4 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From a combination of Old English wiernan (from Proto-Germanic *warnijanÄ…; compare Danish værne) and Old English wearnian (from Proto-Germanic *warnōnÄ…; compare Swedish varna).

    From Wiktionary

  • Old English warnian, from Proto-Germanic *warnōnÄ…. Cognate with German warnen, Dutch waarnen.

    From Wiktionary