Tip-off meaning

tĭp'ôf', -ŏf'
A piece of confidential, advance, or inside information.
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An indication of an otherwise unknown fact or probability.

The judge called for a pitcher of water, a tip-off that the session would be long.

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An act of starting play at the beginning of a period with a jump ball.
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The act of tipping off.
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A tip; confidential disclosure, hint, or warning.
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(idiomatic) An obvious clue or indication.

The broken window and overturned plant pots were a tip-off that something was wrong.

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(idiomatic) A report of suspicious behaviour, especially to an authority.

The police received a tip-off about a recent bank robbery.

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(idiomatic) To alert or inform someone.

An anonymous caller tipped off the police that the suspect would be in the area.

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(basketball) To put the ball in play by throwing it up between two opponents.
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Origin of tip-off

  • tip (kick)off
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition