Stranger meaning

strānjər
Frequency:
One who is neither a friend nor an acquaintance.
noun
5
2
A person whom one does not know; a person who is neither a friend nor an acquaintance.

That gentleman is a stranger to me.

Children are taught not to talk to strangers.

noun
3
0
The definition of a stranger is person you do not know, or someone unknown in a place or a community, or a person who is unfamiliar with something.

A person you have never ever met before who just shows up at your work is an example of a stranger.

A person who moves to a new town and doesn't know anyone is an example of a stranger.

A person who lies all the time is an example of someone who would be described as a stranger to the truth.

noun
3
1
A visitor or guest.
noun
2
1
A guest or visitor.
noun
2
1
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A foreigner, newcomer, or outsider.
noun
1
1
One who is unaccustomed to or unacquainted with something specified; a novice.

A stranger to our language; no stranger to hardship.

noun
1
1
One that is neither privy nor party to a title, act, or contract.
noun
1
1
An outsider, newcomer, or foreigner.
noun
1
1
A person not known or familiar to one; person who is not an acquaintance.
noun
1
1
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(obsolete) To estrange; to alienate.

verb
1
1
A person unaccustomed (to something specified); novice.

An athlete who is no stranger to physical pain.

noun
0
0
A person who is not party (to an act, agreement, title, etc.)
noun
0
0
Comparative form of strange: more strange.
adjective
0
0
noun
0
0
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noun
0
0
(humorous) One who has not been seen for a long time.

Hello, stranger!

noun
0
0
(law) One not privy or party an act, contract, or title; a mere intruder or intermeddler; one who interferes without right.

Actual possession of land gives a good title against a stranger having no title.

noun
0
0

Origin of stranger

  • Middle English from Old French estrangier from estrange strange strange

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Old French estrangier (“foreign, alien"), from Latin extraneus (“foreign, external") (whence also English estrange), from extra (“outside of").

    From Wiktionary