Shame definition

shām
A painful emotion caused by the belief that one is, or is perceived by others to be, inferior or unworthy of affection or respect because of one's actions, thoughts, circumstances, or experiences.

Felt shame for having dropped out of school.

noun
15
3
Dishonor or disgrace.

To bring shame to one's family.

noun
4
1
Shame is a painful feeling of regret, guilt or embarrassment.

An example of shame is a wife feeling guilty about cheating on her husband.

noun
3
0
Respect for propriety or morality.

Have you no shame?

noun
2
0
(psychiatry) A pervasive, negative emotional state, usually originating in childhood, marked by chronic self-reproach and a sense of personal failure.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
Something regrettable, unfortunate, or outrageous.

It's a shame that he wasn't told.

noun
1
0
To cause to feel shame; make ashamed.
verb
1
0
To dishonor or disgrace.
verb
1
0
To drive, force, or impel by a sense of shame.

Shamed into apologizing.

verb
1
0
Uncomfortable or painful feeling due to recognition or consciousness of impropriety, dishonor, or other wrong in the opinion of the person experiencing the feeling. It is caused by awareness of exposure of circumstances of unworthiness or of improper or indecent conduct.

When I realized that I had hurt my friend, I felt deep shame.

The teenager couldn't bear the shame of introducing his parents.

noun
1
0
Advertisement
A person or thing that brings shame, dishonor, or disgrace.
noun
1
1
A painful emotion caused by the awareness of having done something wrong or foolish.

Felt shame for cheating on the exam.

noun
0
0
Respect for propriety or morality.

Have you no shame?

noun
0
0
A condition of disgrace or dishonor; ignominy.

An act that brought shame on the whole family.

noun
0
0
A regrettable or unfortunate situation.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
One that brings dishonor, disgrace, or condemnation.
noun
0
0
To cause to feel shame.
verb
0
0
To cause to feel ashamed to the point of doing something.

I was shamed into making an apology.

verb
0
0
To bring dishonor or disgrace on.

Behavior that shamed him in the eyes of the community.

verb
0
0
To disgrace by surpassing.

Wanted revenge because a rival had shamed him in the previous race.

verb
0
0
Advertisement
Something to regret.

It was a shame not to see the show after driving all that way.

noun
0
0
Reproach incurred or suffered; dishonour; ignominy; derision.
noun
0
0
(archaic) That which is shameful and private, especially body parts.

Cover your shame!

noun
0
0
A cry of admonition for the subject of a speech, often used reduplicated, especially in political debates.
interjection
0
0
(South Africa) Expressing sympathy.

Shame, you poor thing, you must be cold!

interjection
0
0
Advertisement
I do shame / To think of what a noble strain you are. "” Shakespeare.
verb
0
0
To cause to feel shame.

I was shamed by the teacher's public disapproval.

verb
0
0
To cover with reproach or ignominy; to dishonour; to disgrace.
verb
0
0
A painful feeling of having lost the respect of others because of the improper behavior, incompetence, etc. of oneself or of someone that one is close to or associated with.
noun
0
1
A tendency to have feelings of this kind, or a capacity for such feeling.
noun
0
1
Advertisement
put to shame
  • To cause to feel shame.
  • To outdo thoroughly; surpass:
    Your kindness has put the rest of us to shame.
idiom
0
0
sense of shame
  • An understanding and respect for propriety and morality.
idiom
0
0
for shame!
  • you ought to be ashamed! here is cause for shame!
idiom
0
0
put to shame
  • to cause to feel shame
  • to do much better than; surpass; outdo
idiom
0
0
shame on
  • shame should be felt by; this is shameful of
idiom
0
0
Advertisement

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of shame

  • Middle English from Old English sceamu

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old English scamu, scomu, sceamu, sceomu (“shame"), from Proto-Germanic *skamō, and thus cognate with Old High German skama (whence German Scham), Old Dutch skama (Dutch schaamte), Old Frisian skame (West Frisian skamte), and Old Norse skÇ«mm (whence Icelandic skömm, Danish skam). From Proto-Indo-European *ḱem- (“cover, shroud"), which may also be the source of heaven; see that entry for details.

    From Wiktionary

  • Compare also Persian شرم (Å¡arm) and Tosk Albanian shaj (“to insult, offend, slander") / Gheg Albanian shamë (“an insult, offence").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English scamian.

    From Wiktionary