Pride definition

prīd
A sense of one's own proper dignity or value; self-respect.
noun
46
23
Pleasure or satisfaction taken in an achievement, possession, or association.

Parental pride.

noun
31
18
Proper respect for oneself; sense of one's own dignity or worth; self-respect.
noun
22
10
A person or thing in which pride is taken.
noun
16
12
Lust; sexual desire; especially, excitement of sexual appetite in a female beast.
noun
3
1
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Arrogant or disdainful conduct or treatment; haughtiness.
noun
18
18
Delight or satisfaction in one's own or another's achievements, in associations, etc.
noun
11
11
An unduly high opinion of oneself; exaggerated self-esteem; conceit.
noun
2
2
(informal) Any impressive group.
noun
1
1
(zoology) A company of lions.
noun
1
1
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(reflexive) To take or experience pride in something, be proud of it.

I pride myself on being a good judge of character, but pride goes before the fall and I'm not a good judge of my own character so I'm often wrong without knowing it.

verb
1
1
To indulge (oneself) in a feeling of pleasure or satisfaction.

I pride myself on this beautiful garden.

verb
8
9
The best of a class, group, society, etc.; pick; flower.
noun
7
8
Mettle (in a horse)
noun
7
8
(rare) To make proud.
verb
4
5
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(person) Died 1658; Eng. army officer: in 1648 brought about the expulsion (Pride's Purge) of over 100 Royalist & Presbyterian Members of Parliament.
proper name
4
5
Pride is the state of holding one's self or another in high esteem.

An example of pride is the feeling a parent has when his child graduates from college.

noun
2
3
(zoology) The small European lamprey species Petromyzon branchialis.
noun
0
1
Show; ostentation; glory.
noun
0
1
Highest pitch; elevation reached; loftiness; prime; glory,
noun
0
1
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The best part; prime.

In the pride of manhood.

noun
3
5
That of which one is proud; that which excites boasting or self-gratulation; the occasion or ground of self-esteem, or of arrogant and presumptuous confidence, as beauty, ornament, noble character, children etc.
noun
1
3
Pride is defined as to indulge in feelings of self satisfaction.

An example of pride is to be extremely content with one's sewing skills.

verb
0
2
The most successful or thriving condition; prime.

The pride of youth.

noun
0
2
Ornament.
noun
0
2
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(often with of or in) A sense of one's own worth, and abhorrence of what is beneath or unworthy of one; lofty self-respect; noble self-esteem; elevation of character; dignified bearing; proud delight; -- in a good sense.

He took pride in his work.

He had pride of ownership in his department.

noun
0
2
Proud or disdainful behavior or treatment; insolence or arrogance of demeanor; haughty bearing and conduct; insolent exultation; disdain; hubris.
noun
0
2
Consciousness of power; fullness of animal spirits; mettle; wantonness.
noun
0
2
Mettle or spirit in horses.
noun
2
5
The definition of a pride is a group of lions.

An example of pride is the family of lions in The Lion King.

noun
0
3
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A flamboyant or impressive group.

A pride of acrobats.

noun
0
3
A cause or source of pleasure or satisfaction; the best of a group or class.

These soldiers were their country's pride.

noun
0
3
(obs.) Sexual desire.
noun
0
3
Haughty behavior resulting from this; arrogance.
noun
0
3
A group or family (of lions)
noun
0
3
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Magnificence; splendor.
noun
0
3
The quality or state of being proud; inordinate self-esteem; an unreasonable conceit of one's own superiority in talents, beauty, wealth, rank etc., which manifests itself in lofty airs, distance, reserve and often contempt of others.
noun
0
3
(zoology) A group of lions, usually consisting of several related females and their offspring and a small number of unrelated adult males.
noun
9
13
An excessively high opinion of oneself; conceit.
noun
7
12
pride oneself on
  • to be proud of
idiom
4
3
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
pride
Plural:
prides

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

pride oneself on

Origin of pride

  • Middle English from Old English prȳde from prūd proud proud

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English pride, from Old English prȳde, prȳte (“pride") (compare Old Norse prýði (“bravery, pomp")), derivative of Old English prÅ«d (“proud").

    From Wiktionary