Embarrass meaning

ĕm-bărəs
To hinder with obstacles or difficulties; impede.
verb
4
2
To embarass is defined as to make someone feel self-conscious or make someone feel badly about himself.

An example of embarass is when you tease someone in front of his friends about a mistake he has made.

verb
4
4
To humiliate; to disrupt somebody's composure or comfort with acting publicly or freely; to disconcert; to abash.

The crowd's laughter and jeers embarrassed him.

verb
2
0
To involve in or hamper with financial difficulties.

The company was embarrassed and had to mortgage its properties.

verb
1
0
To cause difficulties to; hinder; impede.
verb
1
0
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To cause to be in debt; cause financial difficulties to.
verb
1
0
To make more difficult; complicate.
verb
1
0
To become flustered, self-conscious, etc.

The child embarrasses easily.

verb
1
0
To involve in difficulties concerning money matters; to encumber with debt; to beset with urgent claims or demands.

A man or his business is embarrassed when he can not meet his pecuniary engagements.

verb
1
0
To cause to feel self-conscious, confused, and ill at ease; disconcert; fluster.
verb
1
1
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To cause to feel self-conscious or ill at ease; disconcert.

Meeting adults embarrassed the shy child.

verb
1
2
To hinder from liberty of movement; to impede; to obstruct.

Business is embarrassed; public affairs are embarrassed.

verb
0
0

Origin of embarrass

  • French embarrasser to encumber, hamper from Spanish embarazar from Italian imbarazzare from imbarazzo obstacle, obstruction from imbarrare to block, bar in- in (from Latin en–1) barra bar (from Vulgar Latin barra)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • from Italian imbarazzare, from imbarazzo (“obstacle, obstruction”), from imbarrare (“to block, bar”), from im- (“in”) + barra (“bar”), from Vulgar Latin barra, of unknown origin.

    From Wiktionary

  • from Portuguese embaraçar, from em- (“in”) (from Latin im-) + baraça (“noose, rope”), or

    From Wiktionary