Sanguine definition

sănggwĭn
Cheerful and confident; optimistic; hopeful.
adjective
17
1
Of a healthy reddish color; ruddy.

A sanguine complexion.

adjective
6
2
Of the color of blood; red.
adjective
2
0
Anticipating the best; optimistic; not despondent; confident; full of hope.

Sanguine of success.

adjective
1
1
Cheerfully confident; optimistic.

Sanguine about the prospects for an improved economy.

adjective
0
0
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At ease; accepting.
adjective
0
0
Having the colour of blood; red.
adjective
0
0
Blood colour; red.

noun
0
0
Anything of a blood-red colour, as cloth.
noun
0
0
noun
0
0
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Red crayon. See the Note under crayon, 1.
noun
0
0
To stain with blood; to impart the colour of blood to; to ensanguine.
verb
0
0
Of the color of blood; ruddy.
adjective
1
2
In medieval physiology, having the warm, passionate, cheerful temperament and the healthy, ruddy complexion of one in whom the blood is the predominant humor of the four.
adjective
1
2
The definition of sanguine is someone or something the color of blood or a reddish color.

An example of sanguine is rosy cheeks.

adjective
0
1
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Having the temperament and ruddy complexion formerly thought to be characteristic of a person dominated by this humor; passionate.
adjective
0
1
Of a healthy reddish color; ruddy.

A sanguine complexion.

adjective
0
1
1597 "” Shakespeare, 1 Hen IV ii 4

I'll be no longer guilty of this sin; this sanguine coward, this.

Bed-presser, this horse-back-breaker, this huge hill of flesh.

adjective
0
1
Characterized by abundance and active circulation of blood.

A sanguine bodily temperament.

adjective
0
1
Warm; ardent.

A sanguine temper.

adjective
0
1
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Having blood as the dominant humor in terms of medieval physiology.
adjective
1
3
adjective
0
2
Of the color of blood; red.
adjective
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
sanguine
Plural:
sanguines

Origin of sanguine

  • Middle English blood-red, dominated by the humor blood, ruddy from Old French sanguin from Latin sanguineus bloody, blood-red from sanguis sanguin- blood

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French sanguin, ultimately from Latin sanguineus (“of blood"), from sanguis (“blood"), of uncertain origin, perhaps Proto-Indo-European *h₁shâ‚‚-én-, from *h₁éshâ‚‚rÌ¥ (“blood").

    From Wiktionary