Sallow meaning

sălō
A willow twig.
noun
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The definition of sallow is skin that looks a little yellow.

An example of sallow used as an adjective is sallow skin which is when a person’s face looks yellowish because of an illness.

adjective
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To sallow is defined as to make a complexion have a yellowish color.

An example of sallow is to inject certain medications that are known to change the color of the complexion if injested in large quantities.

verb
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Of a sickly yellowish hue or complexion.
adjective
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To make sallow.
verb
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Any of several low-growing or shrubby European willows, especially Salix caprea or S. cinerea, having large catkins that appear early in the spring and formerly used as a source of charcoal and tannin.
noun
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Of a sickly, pale-yellow hue or complexion.
adjective
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To make sallow.
verb
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A kind of willow (Salix caprea) with large catkins of flowers which appear before the leaves.
noun
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Relating to a sickly yellowish hue or complexion.
adjective
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To make sallow.
verb
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(skin colour) Yellowish.
  • (most regions, of Caucasian skin) Of a sickly pale colour.
  • (Ireland) Of a tan colour, associated with people from southern Europe or East Asia.
adjective
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adjective
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A European willow, Salix caprea, that has broad leaves, large catkins and tough wood.
noun
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Willow twigs.
noun
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Origin of sallow

  • Middle English saloue from Old English sealh

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English salowe from Old English salo

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English salwe, from Old English sealh, from Proto-Germanic *salhaz, masculine variant of *salhō, *salhjōn (compare Low German Sal, Saal; Swedish sälg), from Proto-Indo-European *shâ‚‚lk-, *shâ‚‚lik- (compare Welsh helyg, Latin salix), probably originally a borrowing from some other language.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English salowe, from Old English salu, from Proto-Germanic *salwaz (compare Dutch zaluw, dialectal German sal), from Proto-Indo-European *solH- (compare Welsh halog, Latin salÄ«va, Russian соловый (solóvyj, “cream-colored")).

    From Wiktionary