Monotone meaning

mŏnə-tōn
A succession of sounds or words uttered in a single tone of voice.
noun
10
3
A single, unchanging musical tone.
noun
7
5
The definition of monotone is something flat or unchanging in pitch, or something that is all one color.

A tone of voice that never changes or goes up and down is an example of a voice that would be described as monotone.

A solid blue wall is an example of something that is monotone in color.

If you paint every room in your house the same dull flat beige, this is an example of a time when your house is monotone.

adjective
4
3
Monotone is a continuous sound, especially of someone speaking, that doesn't change in pitch or inflection.

An example of a monotone is when someone has a dull-flat voice, like Ben Stein.

noun
3
3
Designating sequences, the successive members of which either consistently increase or decrease but do not oscillate in relative value. Each member of a monotone increasing sequence is greater than or equal to the preceding member; each member of a monotone decreasing sequence is less than or equal to the preceding member.
adjective
2
1
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Recitation, chanting, or singing in such a tone.
noun
2
1
A person who can sing only in such a tone.
noun
2
1
adjective
2
1
(of speech or a sound) Having a single unvaried pitch.
adjective
2
1
(mathematics) Property of a function to be either always decreasing or always increasing.
adjective
2
1
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A single unvaried tone of speech or a sound.

When Tima felt like her parents were treating her like a servant, she would speak in monotone and act as though she were a robot.

noun
2
1
(intransitive) To speak in a monotone.
verb
2
1
Characterized by or uttered in a monotone.

A monotone recitation of names.

adjective
2
2
Of or having a single color.

A cat with a monotone coat.

adjective
2
2
Sameness or dull repetition in sound, style, manner, or color.
noun
1
0
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Monotony or sameness of tone, style, manner, color, etc.
noun
1
0

Origin of monotone

  • From Greek monotonos monotonous monotonous

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From the post-Classical Latin monotonus (“unvarying in tone") or its etymon the Ancient Greek μονότονος (monotonos, “steady", “unwavering"); compare cognate adjectives, namely the French monotone, the German monoton, the Italian monotono, and the Spanish monótono, as well as the slightly earlier English noun monotony and adjective monotonical.

    From Wiktionary