Mete meaning

mēt
To allot; distribute; apportion.
verb
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2
(archaic) To measure.
verb
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A boundary; limit.
noun
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A boundary mark or line.
noun
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(archaic, poetic, dialectal) To measure.
verb
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(usually with “out”) To dispense, measure (out), allot (especially punishment, reward etc.).
verb
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A boundary or other limit; a boundary-marker; mere.
noun
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The definition of a mete is a limit or boundary.

An example of a mete is a city boundary.

noun
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1
Mete is defined as to hand out or measure.

An example of mete is to distribute a stack of handouts, one sheet to each student.

verb
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To distribute or allot. Often used with out .

Mete out justice.

verb
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(archaic) To measure.
verb
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1
A boundary line; a limit.
noun
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1

Origin of mete

  • Middle English meten from Old English metan med- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman from Latin mēta turning post, boundary

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English meten, from Old English metan (“to measure, mete out, mark off, compare, estimate; pass over, traverse”), from Proto-Germanic *metaną (“to measure”), from Proto-Indo-European *med- (“to measure, consider”). Cognate with Scots mete (“to measure”), West Frisian mjitte (“to measure”), Dutch meten (“to measure”), German messen (“to measure”), Swedish mäta (“to measure”), Latin modus (“limit, measure, target”), Ancient Greek μεδίμνος (medímnos, “measure, bushel”), Ancient Greek μέδεσθαι (médesthai, “care for”), Old Armenian միտ (mit, “mind”).

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English, from Old French mete (“boundary, boundary marker”), from Latin mēta (“post, goal, marker”), from Proto-Indo-European *meit- (“stake, post”). Cognate with Old English wullmod ("distaff").

    From Wiktionary