Dole definition

dōl
The distribution by the government of relief payments to the unemployed.
noun
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A share of money, food, or clothing that has been charitably given.

Increasing the monthly dole given to poor families.

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(archaic) One's fate.
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To give out, especially in portions or shares; allot or distribute. Often used with out:

The mayor doled out jobs to those who had supported him in the election.

verb
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Sorrow; grief; dolor.
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A giving out of money or food to those in great need; relief.
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That which is thus given out.
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Anything given out sparingly.
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(informal, chiefly brit.) A form of government aid to the unemployed, as in England.
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(archaic) One's destiny or lot.
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To give sparingly or as a dole.
verb
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(archaic) Sorrow; dolor.
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The definition of a dole is charitable giving.

An example of a dole is food given to the homeless.

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To dole is defined as to give out or share.

An example of to dole is to give out clothing to the needy.

verb
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To distribute in small amounts; to share out small portions of a meager resource.
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Money or other goods given as charity.
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Distribution; dealing; apportionment.
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(informal) Payment by the state to the unemployed.

I get my dole paid twice a week.

I′ve been on the dole for two years now.

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(UK, dialect) A void space left in tillage.
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(archaic) Sorrow or grief; dolour.
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(law, Scotland) Dolus.
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on the dole
  • Receiving regular relief payments from or as if from the government.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

on the dole

Origin of dole

  • Middle English dol from Old French dol, deul from Late Latin dolus from Latin dolēre to feel pain, grieve

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English dol part, share from Old English dāl dail- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English dol, from Old English dāl (“portion, share, division, allotment”), from Proto-Germanic *dailą (“part, deal”), from Proto-Indo-European *dhAil- (“part, watershed”). Cognate with Albanian thelë (“portion, piece”) and Old Church Slavonic [script?] (dola), [script?] (dilu, “part”). More at deal.

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle English dole (“grief”), from Old French doel (compare French deuil), from Late Latin dolus, from Latin doleo.

    From Wiktionary