Metcalfe-s-law meaning

Dr. Bob Metcalfe, inventor of Ethernet, once said that the network’s power grows exponentially by the number of computers linked to it. According to him, every computer added to the network not only utilizes the network as a resource but also adds more choice and value. This is Metcalfe’s Law. By the same token, it has been argued by security experts that the power of crack attacks grows exponentially as more crackers from developed, developing, and third-world countries get on the Internet, the information highway.
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"The value of a network increases exponentially with the number of nodes," coined by Bob Metcalfe, founder of 3Com Corporation and major designer of Ethernet. A network becomes more useful as more users are connected. A primary example is the Internet. It fostered global email, which became more valuable as more users adopted it. See laws.
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The value of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of users (n 2 ) of the system. Robert Metcalfe developed the law to describe the value of Ethernet, which he invented in early 1973. Metcalfe's law is used to describe the value of network technologies such as telephones, fax machines, the Internet, and the World Wide Web (WWW). See also Ethernet and Metcalfe, Robert Melancton.
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The law that states that the usefulness of a telecommunications network is proportional to the square of the number of its users.
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Origin of metcalfe-s-law

  • From Robert Metcalfe American technology pioneer

    From Wiktionary