Mercy meaning

mûrsē
Frequency:
A disposition to be kind and forgiving.

A heart full of mercy.

noun
39
6
Compassionate treatment, especially of those under one's power; clemency.
noun
24
8
A refraining from harming or punishing offenders, enemies, persons in one's power, etc.; kindness in excess of what may be expected or demanded by fairness; forbearance and compassion.
noun
21
6
Alleviation of distress; relief.

Taking in the refugees was an act of mercy.

noun
11
3
Kind or compassionate treatment; relief of suffering.
noun
7
1
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A disposition to forgive, pity, or be kind.
noun
5
0
The power to forgive or be kind; clemency.

To throw oneself on the mercy of the court.

noun
5
0
Used to express surprise, annoyance, fear, etc.
interjection
4
3
Imprisonment rather than the death penalty imposed on those found guilty of capital crimes.
noun
3
1
A fortunate thing; thing to be grateful for; blessing.

A mercy he wasn't killed.

noun
2
0
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The definition of mercy is compassionate treatment, having a capacity to forgive or showing kindness.

An example of mercy is giving someone a lighter punishment than they deserve.

noun
0
0
(uncountable) Relenting; forbearance to cause or allow harm to another.

She took mercy on him and quit embarrassing him.

noun
0
0
(uncountable) Forgiveness or compassion, especially toward those less fortunate.

Have mercy on the poor and assist them if you can.

noun
0
0
(uncountable) A tendency toward forgiveness, pity, or compassion.

Mercy is one of his many virtues.

noun
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0
(countable) Instances of forbearance or forgiveness.

Psalms 40:11 Do not withhold Your tender mercies from me, O Lord.

noun
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0
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A blessing, something to be thankful for.

It was a mercy that we were not inside when the roof collapsed.

noun
0
0
(phrasal) Subjugation, power.
noun
0
0
A female given name, one of the less common Puritan virtue names.
pronoun
0
0
Something for which to be thankful; a blessing.

It was a mercy that no one was hurt.

noun
0
1
at the mercy of
  • Without any protection against; helpless before:
    Drifting in an open boat, at the mercy of the elements.
idiom
0
0
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at the mercy of
  • completely in the power of
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of mercy

  • Middle English from Old French merci from Medieval Latin mercēs from Latin reward

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English merci, from Anglo-Norman merci (compare Old French merci, mercit), from Latin mercÄ“dem, accusative of mercÄ“s (“wages, fee, price"), from merx (“wares, merchandise"). Displaced native Middle English are, ore "mercy" (from Old English ār "mercy, grace"), Middle English mildse "mercy, clemency" (from Old English milds, milts "mercy, kindness").

    From Wiktionary