Revenge meaning

rĭ-vĕnj
Revenge is an action of inflicting harm or damage on someone else in retaliation for harm or damage inflicted on you.

An example of revenge is when someone steals your car so you steal their car years later.

noun
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To inflict punishment in return for (injury or insult).
verb
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To seek or take vengeance for (oneself or another person); avenge.
verb
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To take vengeance.
verb
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The act of taking vengeance for injuries or wrongs; retaliation.

Took revenge on her tormentors.

noun
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The act of revenging; vengeance.
noun
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Desire to take vengeance; vindictive spirit.
noun
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Any form of personal retaliatory action against an individual, institution, or group for some perceived harm or injustice.

Indifference is the sweetest revenge.

When I left my wife, she tried to set fire to the house in revenge.

noun
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(reflexive) To take one's revenge (on or upon) someone.
verb
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To take revenge for (a particular harmful action), to avenge.

Arsenal revenged its loss to Manchester United last time with a 5-0 drubbing this time.

verb
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To inflict damage, injury, or punishment in return for (an injury, insult, etc.); retaliate for.
verb
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A desire for revenge; spite or vindictiveness.

He did it out of revenge.

noun
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To take vengeance in behalf of (a person, oneself, etc.); avenge.
verb
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What is done in revenging.
noun
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A chance to retaliate or get satisfaction, as by a return match after a defeat.
noun
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(intransitive, archaic) To take vengeance; to revenge itself.
verb
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be revenged
  • To get revenge.
idiom
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

be revenged

Origin of revenge

  • Middle English revengen from Old French revengier re- re- vengier to take revenge (from Latin vindicāre to avenge) (from vindex vindic- avenger deik- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle French revenge, a derivation from Middle French revenger, from Old French revengier (possibly influenced by Old Provençal revènge (“revenge, comeback"), from Old Provençal revenir (“to come back")), a variant of Middle French revancher, from Old French revenchier. The variants Old French vengier (whence French venger) and Old French venchier are both descended from Latin vindicare, with stress-conditioned different parallel development in the inflectional forms. Compare avenge and vengeance.

    From Wiktionary