Animus Definition

ănə-məs
noun
A feeling of animosity; ill will.
American Heritage
An animating force or underlying purpose; intention.
Webster's New World
An attitude that informs one's actions; disposition or intention.
American Heritage
In Jungian psychology, the masculine component of the unconscious of a woman, specif. when apprehended as a male figure by the psyche.
Webster's New World
A feeling of strong ill will or hatred; animosity.
Webster's New World
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adjective
Purposefully; intentionally.
Webster's New World Law
Animosity; hostility; ill will; strong dislike; hate.
Webster's New World Law
The animating thought, intention, or purpose of an act.
Webster's New World Law

Other Word Forms of Animus

Noun

Singular:
animus
Plural:
animuses

Origin of Animus

  • From Latin animus (“the mind, in a great variety of meanings: the rational soul in man, intellect, consciousness, will, intention, courage, spirit, sensibility, feeling, passion, pride, vehemence, wrath, etc., the breath, life, soul”), closely related to anima, which is a feminine form; see anima.

    From Wiktionary

  • Latin anə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

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