Liege meaning

lēj
A liege is defined as a lord to be loyal to, or a loyal subject of a monarch.

An example of a liege is a person who honored their lord or monarch during the feudal system.

noun
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The definition of liege is loyal, especially in a relationship between a lord and his servants.

An example of a liege lord is someone who is entitled to the loyalty of his subjects.

adjective
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A lord or sovereign to whom allegiance and service are due according to feudal law.
noun
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A loyal subject to a monarch.
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Loyal; faithful.
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A city of eastern Belgium near the Dutch and German borders. First mentioned in 558, it was a noted intellectual center in the Middle Ages. Liège was held by France from 1794 to 1815 and by the Netherlands from 1815 to 1830.
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Loyal; faithful.
adjective
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A lord or sovereign.
noun
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A subject or vassal.
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(place) Province of E Belgium: 1,491 sq mi (3,862 sq km)
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(place) Its capital, on the Meuse River.
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A free and independent person; specifically, a lord paramount; a sovereign.
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The subject of a sovereign or lord; a liegeman.
noun
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Sovereign; independent; having authority or right to allegiance.

A liege lord.

adjective
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Serving an independent sovereign or master; bound by a feudal tenure; obliged to be faithful and loyal to a superior, as a vassal to his lord; faithful; loyal.

A liege man; a liege subject.

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A vassal or subject owing allegiance and services to a lord or sovereign under feudal law.
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Origin of liege

  • Middle English from Old French entitled to feudal allegiance from Late Latin laeticus being a semifree colonist in Gaul from laetus a semifree colonist of Germanic origin lē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English lege, lige, liege, from Anglo-Norman lige, from Old French liege (“liege, free"), from Middle High German ledic, ledec (“free, empty, vacant") (Modern German ledig (“unmarried")) from Proto-Germanic *liþugaz (“flexible, free, unoccupied"). Akin to Old Frisian leþeg, leþoch (“free"), Old English liþiÄ¡ (“flexible"), Old Norse liðugr (“free, unhindered"), Middle Dutch ledich (“idle, unemployed") (Dutch ledig (“empty") and leeg (“empty")), Middle English lethi (“unoccupied, at leisure").

    From Wiktionary

  • An alternate etymology traces the Old French word from Late Latin laeticus "of or relating to a semifree colonist in Gaul" from laetus "a semi-free colonist", of Germanic origin, akin to Old English læt (“servant").

    From Wiktionary