Fallacy definition

fălə-sē
Frequency:
A statement or an argument based on a false or invalid inference.
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A false notion.
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Incorrectness of reasoning or belief; erroneousness.
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(obs.) Deception.
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Aptness to mislead; deceptive or delusive quality.

The fallacy of the senses.

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A false or mistaken idea, opinion, etc.; error.
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The quality of being deceptive.
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The definition of a fallacy is a deceptive or false notion.

An example of fallacy is the idea that the sun spins around the earth.

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An error in reasoning; flaw or defect in argument.
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(logic) An argument which does not conform to the rules of logic, esp. one that appears to be sound.
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Deceptive or false appearance; deceitfulness; that which misleads the eye or the mind; deception.
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(logic) An argument, or apparent argument, which professes to be decisive of the matter at issue, while in reality it is not. A specious argument.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
fallacy
Plural:
fallacies

Origin of fallacy

  • Alteration of Middle English fallace from Old French from Latin fallācia deceit from fallāx fallāc- deceitful from fallere to deceive

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old French fallace, from Latin fallacia (“deception, deceit”), from fallax (“deceptive, deceitful”), from fallere (“to deceive”).

    From Wiktionary