Crazy meaning

krāzē
One who is or appears to be mentally deranged.
noun
35
7
(informal) Very enthusiastic or eager.

Crazy about the movies.

adjective
28
5
(slang) An eccentric or mentally unbalanced person.
noun
13
2
Temporarily unbalanced, as with great excitement or rage.
adjective
12
1
(informal) Departing from proportion or moderation, especially:
  • Possessed by enthusiasm or excitement.
    The crowd at the game went crazy.
  • Immoderately fond; infatuated.
    Was crazy about boys.
  • Intensely involved or preoccupied.
    Is crazy about cars and racing.
  • Foolish or impractical; senseless.
    A crazy scheme for making quick money.
adjective
12
2
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(informal) Foolish, wild, fantastic, etc.; not sensible.

A crazy idea.

adjective
8
0
Mentally deranged.
adjective
5
2
(slang) Used to express approval, pleasure, wonder, etc.: now rare.
interjection
4
2
The definition of crazy is someone or something that is insane or not mentally sound.

An example of crazy is an idea that makes absolutely no sense.

An example of crazy is a person who is in a mental hospital and who is yelling, hallucinating and otherwise acting like they are insane.

adjective
3
0

His ideas were both frightening and crazy.

adjective
1
0
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Out of control.

When she gets on the motorcycle she goes crazy.

adjective
0
0
Overly excited or enthusiastic.

He went crazy when he won.

adjective
0
0
In love; experiencing romantic feelings.

Why is she so crazy about him?

adjective
0
0
(informal) Unexpected; surprising.

The game had a crazy ending.

adjective
0
0
Characterized by weakness or feebleness; decrepit; broken; falling to decay; shaky; unsafe.
adjective
0
0
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(slang) Very, extremely.

That trick was crazy good.

adverb
0
0
An insane or eccentric person; a crackpot.
noun
0
0
(informal) like crazy
  • To an exceeding degree:
    They were running around like crazy.
idiom
2
0
like crazy
  • with great energy, intensity, etc.; without restraint
idiom
3
0

Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
crazy
Comparative
crazier
Superlative
craziest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of crazy

  • From EtymOnline: 1570s, "diseased, sickly," from craze + -y (2). Meaning "full of cracks or flaws" is from 1580s; that of "of unsound mind, or behaving as so" is from 1610s. Jazz slang sense "cool, exciting" attested by 1927. To drive (someone) crazy is attested by 1873. Phrase crazy like a fox recorded from 1935. Crazy Horse, Teton Lakhota (Siouan) war leader (d.1877) translates thašuka witko, lit. "his horse is crazy."

    From Wiktionary