Broker meaning

brōkər
The definition of a broker is a person who buys and sells things on behalf of others.

A person who you hire to buy stock for you on the stock exchange is an example of a broker.

noun
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One that acts as an agent for others, as in negotiating contracts, purchases, or sales in return for a fee or commission.
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To arrange or manage as a broker.

Broker an agreement among opposing factions.

verb
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A mediator between a buyer and seller.
noun
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(computing) An agent involved in the exchange of messages or transactions.
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A stockbroker.
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A power broker.
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A person who acts as an agent or intermediary in negotiating contracts, buying and selling, etc.
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noun
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To act as a broker (for)
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To negotiate or bargain; specif., to influence the outcome of (a political convention) by negotiating, making secret agreements, etc.
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An individual or firm who acts as an intermediary between a buyer and seller. A broker usually charges a commission for services. A broker also may be a person who sells insurance products offered by different companies or someone who sells real estate.
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Comparative form of broke: more broke.
adjective
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To act as a broker; to mediate in a sale or transaction.
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To broker is defined as to arrange or facilitate the arrangement of a deal.

If you act as a middleman between people selling a property and people buying a property, this is an example of when you broker the deal.

verb
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A person or entity who, for a commission or a fee, brings together buyers and sellers of property or services and, while acting as the agent of one or both of the parties, helps them negotiate contracts.
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Origin of broker

  • Middle English from Anglo-Norman brocour, abrocour Spanish alboroque ceremonial gift at conclusion of business deal from Arabic al-barka the blessing colloquial variant of al-baraka al- the baraka blessing, divine favor (from bāraka to bless brk in Semitic roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English broker, brokour, brocour, from Anglo-Norman brocour (“small trader”) (compare also abroker (“to act as a broker”)), from Old Dutch *brokere (“one who determines the usages of trade, manager”), from broke, bruyck, breuck (“use, usage, trade”), from Proto-Germanic *brūkiz (“use, custom”), from Proto-Indo-European *bhrug- (“to use, enjoy”), equivalent to brook +‎ -er. Cognate with Middle Low German brukere (“a broker”), Eastern Frisian broker (“a broker”), Danish bruger (“a broker, user, handler”), Swedish bruk (“use, custom, trade, business”), Old English broc (“use, profit, advantage, foredeal”). Compare also French brocanter (“to deal in second-hand goods”) from the same Germanic source. More at brook.

    From Wiktionary

  • From broke +‎ -er.

    From Wiktionary