Bourgeois meaning

bo͝or-zhwä, bo͝orzhwä
Of or characteristic of a bourgeois or the bourgeoisie; middle-class; also used variously to mean conventional, smug, materialistic, etc.
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Bourgeois is French and means a member of the middle class.

An example of bourgeois are people living in moderately-priced suburban neighborhoods.

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In Marxist theory, a member of the property-owning class; a capitalist.
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A person whose attitudes and behavior are marked by conformity to the standards and conventions of the middle class.
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Of, relating to, or typical of the middle class, especially in holding conventional attitudes and materialistic values.
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The definition of bourgeois is relating to the middle class.

An example of bourgeois is a mid-priced restaurant where many locals frequent.

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A person whose beliefs, attitudes, and practices are conventionally middle-class.
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A person belonging to the middle class.
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A self-employed person, as a shopkeeper or businessman.
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A member of the bourgeoisie, or middle class.
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Bourgeois opinion.

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A person with bourgeois values and attitudes.
noun
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Of or relating to the middle class, especially its attitudes and conventions.
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Belonging to the middle class.
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(Marxism) Of or relating to capitalist exploitation of the proletariat.
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(politics, collectively) The middle class.
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(rare) An individual member of the middle class.
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An individual member of the bourgeoisie, one of the three estates.
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(Marxism) Anyone deemed to be an exploiter of the proletariat, a capitalist.
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(printing) A size of type between long primer and brevier.
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A freeman of a medieval town.
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Origin of bourgeois

  • French from Old French burgeis citizen of a town from bourg bourg bourg

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowed from French bourgeois (“a class of citizens who were wealthier members of the Third Estate”), from Anglo-Norman burgeis (“town dweller”), from Old French borjois, from borc (“town”), from Proto-Germanic *burgz (“fortress”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrgʰ- (“fortified elevation”). The path from Proto-Germanic to Old French is unclear. Perhaps via Frankish *burg or Late Latin *burgus, or possibly both. See also the related word burgess.

    From Wiktionary