Torture meaning

tôr'chər
Torture is defined as to cause another extreme pain.

An example of torture is being openly affectionate with a new lover in front of someone with whom you've just broken up.

An example of torture is cutting off a person's fingers.

verb
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Infliction of severe physical pain as a means of punishment or coercion.
noun
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Excruciating physical or mental pain; agony.

The torture suffered by inmates in the camp.

noun
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An experience or cause of severe pain or anguish.
noun
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Torture is severe mental or physical pain, or the cause of this pain.

An example of torture is a man seeing a woman who just broke up with him out with another man.

An example of torture is a woman being stoned to death.

noun
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To subject (a person or animal) to torture.
verb
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To bring great physical or mental pain upon (another).
verb
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To overwork, misinterpret, or distort.

Torture a metaphor throughout an essay; torture a rule to make it fit a case.

verb
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The inflicting of severe pain, often, specif., in order to obtain information or a confession, get revenge, etc.
noun
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Any method by which such pain is inflicted.
noun
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Any severe physical or mental pain; agony; anguish.
noun
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A cause of such pain or agony.
noun
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A violent twisting, distortion, perversion, etc.
noun
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To subject to torture.
verb
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To cause extreme physical or mental pain to; agonize.
verb
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To twist or distort (meaning, language, etc.)
verb
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Using large dogs to attack bound, hand-cuffed prisoners is clearly torture.

In every war there are acts of torture that cause the world to shudder.

People confess to anything under torture.

noun
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(chiefly literary) The "suffering of the heart" imposed by one on another, as in personal relationships.

Every time she says 'goodbye' it is torture!

noun
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To intentionally inflict severe pain or suffering on (someone).

People who torture often have sadistic tendencies.

verb
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Origin of torture

  • Middle English from Old French from Late Latin tortūra from Latin tortus past participle of torquēre to twist terkw- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Late Latin tortura (“a twisting, wreathing, of bodily pain, a griping colic, Middle Latin pain inflicted by judicial or ecclesiastical authority as a means of persuasion, torture"), from Latin tortus, past participle of torquere (“to twist").
    From Wiktionary