Throat meaning

thrōt
Frequency:
The portion of the digestive tract that lies between the rear of the mouth and the esophagus and includes the fauces and the pharynx.
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The front part of the neck.
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The upper part of the passage leading from the mouth and nose to the stomach and lungs, including the pharynx and the upper larynx, trachea, and esophagus.
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Any narrow passage, part, or entrance; specif., the part of a chimney between the fireplace and the flue.
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To pronounce or sing with a harsh, guttural quality.
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The anterior portion of the neck.
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The front part of the neck.

The wild pitch bounced and hit the catcher in the throat.

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As I swallowed I felt something strange in my throat.

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A narrow opening in a vessel.

The water leaked out from the throat of the bottle.

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Station throat.
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The part of a chimney between the gathering, or portion of the funnel which contracts in ascending, and the flue.

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(nautical) The upper fore corner of a boom-and-gaff sail, or of a staysail.
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(nautical) That end of a gaff which is next the mast.
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(nautical) The angle where the arm of an anchor is joined to the shank.

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(shipbuilding) The inside of a timber knee.
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(obsolete) To utter in the throat; to mutter.

To throat threats.

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(UK, dialect, obsolete) To mow (beans, etc.) in a direction against their bending.
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The definition of a throat is the front of the neck, the passage that leads from the mouth and nose to the stomach and lungs, or the entrance to something.

An example of the throat is the area just under the chin.

An example of the throat is the space where food goes just after you swallow it.

An example of the throat is the narrow part of a trumpet.

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The anterior portion of the neck.
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The portion of the digestive tract that lies between the rear of the mouth and the esophagus and includes the fauces and the pharynx.
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A narrow passage or part suggestive of the human throat.

The throat of a horn.

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The opening of a tubular corolla or calyx where the tube joins the limb.
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To pronounce with a harsh or guttural voice.
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(botany) The orifice of a tubular organ; the outer end of the tube of a monopetalous corolla; the faux, or fauces.
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ram
  • To compel to accept or consider:.
    Always ramming his political opinions down my throat.
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at each other's throats
  • In a state of open, mutual hostility.
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cut each other's throats
  • To ruin each other, as by underselling in business.
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cut one's own throat
  • To be the means of one's own ruin.
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jump down someone's throat
  • To attack or criticize someone suddenly and violently.
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ram something down someone's throat
  • To force someone to accept, hear, etc. something.
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stick in someone's throat
  • To be hard for someone to say, as from reluctance.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of throat

  • Middle English throte from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English throte, from Old English þrote, þrota, þrotu (“throat"), from Proto-Germanic *þrutō (“throat"), from Proto-Indo-European *trud- (“to swell, become stiff"). Cognate with Dutch strot (“throat"), German Droß (“throat"), Icelandic þroti (“swelling").

    From Wiktionary