Temperature meaning

tĕm'pər-ə-cho͝or', -chər, tĕm'prə-
A measure of the quantity of heat in an object, usually as measured on a thermometer.
  • The degree of heat of a living body.
  • An excess of this over the normal (c. 37°C or c. 98.6°F in humans); fever.
  • The degree of heat of the atmosphere.
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Temperament.
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Temperature is the amount of heat in a given area, or the amount of internal heat in a person's body.
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A measure of the ability of a substance, or more generally of any physical system, to transfer heat energy to another physical system. The temperature of a substance is closely related to the average kinetic energy of its molecules.
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The lowest temperatures ever recorded was -129 Fahrenheit in Vostok, Antarctica.

When it is 54 degrees outside, 54 degrees is an example of temperature.

When your body is at 98.6 degrees, this is an example of a normal body temperature.

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Any of various standardized numerical measures of this ability, such as the Kelvin, Fahrenheit, and Celsius scales.
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An abnormally high body temperature; a fever.
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(now rare, archaic) The balance of humours in the body, or one's character or outlook as considered determined from this; temperament.
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A measure of cold or heat, often measurable with a thermometer.

The boiling temperature of pure water is 100 degrees Celsius.

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An elevated body temperature, as present in fever and many illnesses.

You have a temperature; I think you should stay home today. You're sick.

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(when not used in relation with something) The temperature(1) of the immediate environment.

The temperature dropped nearly 20 degrees; it went from hot to cold.

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(thermodynamics) A property of macroscopic amounts of matter that serves to gauge the average intensity of the random actual motions of the individually mobile particulate constituents.
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The highest temperatures ever recorded was 136 Fahrenheit in El Azizia, Libya.
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Origin of temperature

  • Middle English temperate weather Latin temperātūra due measure from temperātus past participle of temperāre to mix temper
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From French température and its source Latin temperatura, from the past participle stem of tempero (“I temper").
    From Wiktionary