Sudden meaning

sŭdn
Happening without warning; unforeseen.

A sudden storm.

adjective
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Happening or done without delay; hasty or immediate.

A sudden decision.

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The definition of sudden is not expected, or happening without warning.

An example of sudden used as an adjective is in the phrase "sudden thunderstorm," which means a thunderstorm that happened with little to no warning.

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Characterized by sharp change in elevation; precipitous.

A sudden drop in the ocean floor.

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Done, coming, or taking place quickly or abruptly; hasty.
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Happening quickly and with little or no warning.

The sudden drop in temperature left everyone cold and confused.

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Milton.

The apples of Asphaltis, appearing goodly to the sudden eye.

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(poetic) Suddenly.
adverb
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(obsolete) An unexpected occurrence; a surprise.
noun
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all of a sudden
  • Very quickly and unexpectedly; suddenly.
idiom
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all of a sudden
  • suddenly; unexpectedly
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Other Word Forms

Adjective

Base Form:
sudden
Comparative
suddenest
Superlative
suddenest

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of sudden

  • Middle English sodain from Old French from Vulgar Latin subitānus from Latin subitāneus from subitus from past participle of subīre to approach stealthily sub- secretly sub– īre to go ei- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English sodain, from Anglo-Norman sodein, from Old French sodain, subdain (“immediate, sudden"), from Vulgar Latin *subitānus (“sudden"), from Latin subitaneus (“sudden"), from subitus (“sudden", literally, "that which has come stealthily"), originally the past participle of subire (“to come or go stealthily"), from sub (“under") + ire (“go").

    From Wiktionary