Seam meaning

sēm
Seam means to join together.

An example of to seam is to sew together the two fronts of a shirt.

verb
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To put together with a seam.
verb
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The definition of a seam is the line of stitches that holds two pieces of fabric together.

An example of a seam is the line on the shoulder of a shirt that joins a sleeve to the main part of a shirt.

noun
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(construction) A joint formed by mating two separate sections of materials.

Seams can be made or sealed in a variety of ways, including adhesive bonding, hot-air welding, solvent welding, using adhesive tapes, sealant, etc.

noun
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1
A line or depression left by a cut or wound; a scar; a cicatrix.
noun
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(figuratively) A line of junction; a joint.
noun
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A thin layer or stratum, as of coal or rock.
noun
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To put together with or as if with a seam.
verb
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A mark, line, ridge, etc. like this, as a scar, wrinkle, mold line on glass, etc.
noun
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(UK, dialect, obsolete) Grease; tallow; lard.

noun
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To make the appearance of a seam in, as in knitting a stocking; hence, to knit with a certain stitch, like that in such knitting.
verb
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To mark with a seam or line; to scar.
verb
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To crack open along a seam.
verb
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(cricket) Of the ball, to move sideways after bouncing on the seam.
verb
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(cricket) Of a bowler, to make the ball move thus.
verb
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To mark with a groove, wrinkle, scar, or other seamlike line.
verb
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To join together so as to form a seam.
verb
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To mark with a seamlike line, crack, wrinkle, etc.
verb
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To develop cracks or fissures.
verb
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A thin layer or stratum, as of coal or rock.
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(sewing) A folded back and stitched piece of fabric; especially, the stitching that joins two or more pieces of fabric.
noun
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noun
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A thin stratum, especially of coal or mineral.
noun
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(cricket) The stitched equatorial seam of a cricket ball; the sideways movement of a ball when it bounces on the seam.
noun
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An old English measure of grain, containing eight bushels.
noun
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An old English measure of glass, containing twenty-four weys of five pounds, or 120 pounds.
noun
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A line across a surface, as a crack, fissure, or wrinkle.
noun
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1
To become fissured or furrowed; crack open.
verb
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A line formed by the joining together of any separate pieces; line marking adjoining edges, as of boards.
noun
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1
A thin layer or stratum of ore, coal, etc.
noun
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burst at the seams
  • To be uncomfortably or dangerously full or overcrowded.
    An apartment bursting at the seams with guests.
idiom
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come apart at the seams
  • To fail to hold together; disintegrate, collapse, etc.
    A trade agreement coming apart at the seams.
idiom
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0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

come apart at the seams

Origin of seam

  • Middle English seme from Old English sēam syū- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English sÄ“am, from Proto-Germanic *saumaz (“that which is sewn"). Cognate with West Frisian seam, Dutch zoom, German Saum, Swedish söm.

    From Wiktionary

  • See saim.

    From Wiktionary