Pod definition

pŏd
A small group of animals, esp. of seals or whales.
noun
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1
To remove (seeds) from a pod.
verb
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2
A suffix meaning “foot.” It is used in the scientific names of the members of many groups of organisms, such as arthropod, an organism having “jointed feet,” and sauropod, a dinosaur having “lizard feet.” It is also used in the names of different kinds of limbs or limblike body parts, such as pseudopod, the “false foot” of an amoeba.
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0
Something resembling a pod, as in compactness.
noun
2
1
To expand or swell like a pod.
verb
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A dry fruit or seed vessel developed from a single carpel enclosing one or more seeds and usually splitting along two sutures at maturity, as a legume.
noun
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A podlike container, as a cocoon of a locust.
noun
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0
Any of various enclosures, as a streamlined housing for a jet engine attached to an aircraft.
noun
1
0
To swell out into a pod.
verb
1
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A sharp groove in certain augers and other tools.
noun
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0
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The socket for the bit in a brace.
noun
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A fruit or seed case that usually splits along two seams to release its seeds when mature. Legumes, such as peas and beans, produce pods.
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(zoology) An egg case of certain insects, especially a locust or other orthopteran.
noun
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1
(geology) An deposit of rock or sediment that is much longer than it is wide.
noun
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1
A casing or housing forming part of a vehicle, as:
  • A streamlined external housing that encloses engines, machine guns, or fuel.
  • A detachable compartment on a spacecraft for carrying personnel or instrumentation.
noun
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A dehiscent fruit of a leguminous plant such as the pea, splitting along two sides.
noun
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1
A dry, several-seeded, dehiscent fruit.
noun
1
1
To bear or produce pods.
verb
1
1
Foot; footlike part.

Pleopod.

suffix
1
1
To bear pods.
verb
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1
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affix
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1
The definition of a pod is a small group of animals.

An example of a pod is a family of dolphins swimming together.

noun
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Pod is defined as a dry fruit or seed vessel containing one or more seeds.

An example of a pod is the outside shell of a green pea.

noun
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A group of marine mammals, such as whales, or of certain other animals, such as hippopotamuses.
noun
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The lengthwise groove in certain boring tools such as augers.
noun
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0
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The socket for holding the bit in a boring tool.
noun
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Having (a specified number or kind of) feet.
affix
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Foot.

Pleopod.

affix
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One having (a specified number or kind of) feet.

Arthropod.

affix
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(botany) A seed case for legumes (e.g. peas, beans, peppers)
noun
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A small vehicle, especially used in emergency situations.
noun
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(intransitive) To bear or produce pods.
verb
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0
To remove peas from their case.
verb
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(intransitive) To swell or fill.
verb
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0
noun
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0
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initialism
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initialism
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(computing, programming) Plain old data (i.e. a data structure with fields but no methods, properties, etc.)
initialism
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1

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
pod
Plural:
pods

Origin of pod

  • < Gr pous (gen. podos), foot

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • From New Latin -podium (from Greek podion podium) and from New Latin -poda -footed neuter pl. of -pūs (from Greek -pous) (from pous pod- foot ped- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Origin unknown

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English *pod (“seed-pod, husk, shell"), from Old English pād (“an outer garment, covering, coat, cloak"), from Proto-Germanic *paidō (“coat, smock, shirt"), from Proto-Indo-European *baitā- (“woolen clothes"). Cognate with Old Saxon pÄ“da (“skirt"), German dialectal Pfeid, Pfeit (“shirt"), Gothic [script?] (paida, “mantle, skirt"), Albanian petk (“gown, garment, dress, suit"), Ancient Greek [script?] (báitā, “goat-skin, fur-coat or tent").

    From Wiktionary

  • From a special use of Etymology 1. See above.

    From Wiktionary