Husk meaning

hŭsk
Any form of useless, dried-up, and subsequently worthless exterior of something.

His attorney was a dried-up husk of a man.

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The dry outer covering of various fruits or seeds, as of an ear of corn.
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A shell or outer covering, especially when considered worthless.
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The dry, rough, or useless outside covering of anything.
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The outer membranous or green envelope of some fruits or seeds, as that of a walnut or an ear of corn.
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A framework serving as a support.
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To remove the husk from.
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To remove the husk or husks from.
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The dry, leafy or stringy exterior of certain vegetables or fruits, which must be removed before eating the meat inside.

A coconut has a very thick husk.

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To remove husks from.
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To say huskily, to utter in a husky voice.
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Origin of husk

  • Middle English probably diminutive of hus house Middle Dutch hūskijn little house, core of an apple house

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English huske (“husk”), from Old English *husuc, *hosuc (“little covering, sheath”), diminutive of hosu (“pod, shell, husk”), from Proto-Germanic *husōn, *hausaz (“covering, shell, leggings”), from Proto-Indo-European *kawəs- / kawes- (“cover”). More at hose, -ock.

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternate etymology derives husk from Low German hūske (“little house, sheath”) (cognate with Middle Dutch huskjin > Dutch huisken, diminutive of hūs (“house”).)

    From Wiktionary

  • Partly imitative, partly from Etymology 1, above, influenced by husky.

    From Wiktionary