Parenthesis meaning

pə-rĕnthĭ-sĭs
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Parenthesis refer to punctuation marks "(" and ")" used to separate relevant information or a comment from the rest of the text, or to enclose mathematical symbols, or the text inside of these marks.

The punctuation marks in the math equation 2x(4+6) are an example of parenthesis.

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Either or both of the upright curved lines, ( ), used to mark off explanatory or qualifying remarks in writing or printing or enclose a sum, product, or other expression considered or treated as a collective entity in a mathematical operation.
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An interruption of continuity; an interval.
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An additional word, clause, etc. placed as an explanation or comment within an already complete sentence: in writing or printing it is usually marked off by curved lines, dashes, or commas.
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Either or both of the curved lines, ( ), used to mark off parenthetical words, etc. or to enclose mathematical or logical symbols that are to be treated as a single term.
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An episode or incident, often an irrelevant one; interlude.
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The left parenthesis "(" and right parenthesis ")" are used to delineate one expression from another. For example, in the query list for size="34" and (color = "red" or color ="green"), parentheses group the ORs together so they are a distinct entity from the AND.In programming, parentheses are used to surround input parameters of a function call. For example, in C, the string compare statement strnicmp (itemA, itemB, 10) uses parentheses to group the ITEMA, ITEMB and 10 values handed over to the function.
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A clause, phrase or word which is inserted (usually for explanation or amplification) into a passage which is already grammatically complete, and usually marked off with brackets, commas or dashes.
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Either of a pair of brackets, especially round brackets, (and) (used to enclose parenthetical material in a text).
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(rhetoric) A digression; the use of such digressions.
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(mathematics, logic) Such brackets as used to clarify expressions by grouping those terms affected by a common operator, or to enclose the components of a vector or the elements of a matrix.
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Origin of parenthesis

  • Late Latin insertion of a letter or syllable in a word from Greek from parentithenai to insert para- beside para–1 en- in en in Indo-European roots tithenai to put dhē- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Either indirectly via Middle French parenthese or directly from Late Latin parenthesis (“addition of a letter to a syllable in a word"), from Ancient Greek παρένθεσις (parenthesis), from παρεντίθημι (parentithÄ“mi, “I put in beside, mix up"), from παρά (para, “beside") + ἐν (en, “in") + τίθημι (tithÄ“mi, “put, place") (from Proto-Indo-European base *dhe- "to put, to do").

    From Wiktionary