Officiate meaning

ə-fĭshē-āt
To perform the duties and functions of an office or a position of authority.
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To perform from a position of authority (an official duty or function).
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To perform the duties of an office; act as an officer.
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To officiate is to preside over something, to perform a ceremony, or to be in charge of something.

When you referee a football game and are in charge of making sure the rules are followed, this is an example of when you officiate.

When you perform a wedding ceremony for a couple, this is an example of when you officiate.

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To serve as an officiant.
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To serve as a referee or umpire.
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To serve as an officiant at (a ceremony).

Officiated the wedding ceremony.

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To serve as a referee or umpire at (a game).

Officiated the hockey game.

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To perform the functions of a priest, minister, rabbi, etc. at a religious ceremony.
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To act as referee, umpire, etc.
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(intransitive) To perform the functions of some office.

She officiated as registrar at the wedding.

She officiated the wedding as registrar.

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(intransitive, sports) To serve as umpire or referee.

This is the second time he has officiated at a cup-final.

He's never officiated a cup-final before.

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Origin of officiate

  • Medieval Latin officiāre officiāt- to conduct from Latin officium service, duty office

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Circa 17th Century, from Medieval Latin officiātus, perfect passive participle of officiō (“conduct or perform religious services"), from Latin officium (“official duty, service").

    From Wiktionary