Umpire meaning

ŭm'pīr'
A person appointed to rule on plays, especially in baseball.
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To act as referee for; rule or judge.
verb
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To be or act as a referee or an arbitrator.
verb
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To act as umpire.
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(tennis) The official who presides over a tennis game sat on a high chair.
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(cricket) One of the two white-coated officials who preside over a cricket match.
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(baseball) One of usually 4 officials who preside over a baseball game.

The umpire called the pitch a strike.

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(American football) The official who stands behind the line on the defensive side.

The umpire must keep on his toes as the play often occurs around him.

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(Australian rules football) A match official on the ground deciding and enforcing the rules during play. As of 2007 the Australian Football League uses 3, or in the past 2 or just 1. The other officials, the goal umpires and boundary umpires, are normally not called just umpires alone.
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(law) A person who arbitrates between contending parties.
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(sports, intransitive) To act as an umpire in a game.
verb
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To decide as an umpire; to arbitrate; to settle (a dispute, etc.).
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A person appointed to settle a dispute that mediators have been unable to resolve; an arbitrator.
noun
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A person chosen to render a decision in a dispute; judge; arbiter.
noun
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To act as umpire in or of.
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Origin of umpire

  • Middle English (an) oumpere (an) umpire alteration of (a) noumpere a mediator from Old French nonper non- non- per equal, even, paired (from Latin pār pair)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From a Middle English misconstruction of noumpere, from Old French nonper (“odd number, not even (as a tie-breaking arbitrat)"), from non (“not") + per (“equal"), from Latin par (“equal")
    From Wiktionary