Barrack meaning

bărək
Frequency:
(chiefly british) To jeer or shout at a player, speaker, or team.
verb
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To house (soldiers, for example) in quarters.
verb
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A building or group of buildings used to house military personnel.
noun
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A large, unadorned building used for temporary occupancy.
noun
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(australian) To shout support for a team.
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To shout against; jeer at.
verb
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(rare) An improvised hut.
noun
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To house in barracks.
verb
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(chiefly austral.) To jeer or shout at (a player, team, performer, etc.)
verb
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(military, chiefly in the plural) A building for soldiers, especially within a garrison; originally referred to temporary huts, now usually to a permanent structure or set of buildings.
noun
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(chiefly in the plural) Primitive structure resembling a long shed or barn for (usually temporary) housing or other purposes.
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(chiefly in the plural) Any very plain, monotonous, or ugly large building.
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(US, regional) A movable roof sliding on four posts, to cover hay, straw, etc.
noun
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(Ireland, colloquial, usually in the plural) A police station.
noun
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To house military personnel; to quarter.
verb
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(intransitive) To live in barracks.
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(UK) To jeer and heckle; to attempt to disconcert by verbal means.
verb
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(Australia, New Zealand, intransitive) To cheer for a team; to jeer at the opposition team or at the umpire (after an adverse decision).
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Origin of barrack

  • From French baraques barracks from Spanish barracas soldiers' tents or huts

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Perhaps from Irish dialectal barrack to brag akin to brag

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French baraque; from Catalan barraca.

    From Wiktionary