Mortgage meaning

môrgĭj
To make subject to a claim or risk; pledge against a doubtful outcome.

Mortgaged their political careers by taking an unpopular stand.

verb
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(law) To pledge (property) by a mortgage.
verb
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A debt instrument that enables the borrower (mortgagor) to receive funds to purchase real estate. In return, the lender receives a lien on the property as security that the loan will be repaid. The borrower receives access to needed funds and the lender earns interest. The borrower has full use of the property and ownership rights. The lien is removed when the mortgage is paid off in full.
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A grant of a security interest in real property to secure a loan, often for the purchase of the property.
noun
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A mortgage that secures debt incurred in connection with the property as to which the mortgage is given, for example, a mortgage on one’s home given to secure a loan given in order to purchase that home.
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(law) To borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

To mortgage a property, an estate, a shop.

We mortgaged our house in order to start a company.

verb
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To mortgage is when you take a loan and use your property as collateral.

An example of mortgage is when you go to the bank and borrow money against your house.

verb
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To put an advance claim or liability on.

To mortgage one's future.

verb
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The claim of the mortgagee on the property.
noun
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The deed by which this pledge is made.
noun
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A loan secured by an interest in real property.
noun
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The paperwork reflecting such a loan and security interest.
noun
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(law) A special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property such as a house or piece of farm land. The assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower. Once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

We're renting a property in the city centre because we can't afford to get a mortgage yet.

noun
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The document specifying the terms and conditions of the repayment of such a loan.
noun
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The repayment obligation associated with such a loan.

A family who cannot afford their mortgage.

noun
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The right to payment associated with such a loan.

A bank that buys mortgages from originators.

noun
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The lien on the property associated with such a loan.
noun
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To pledge (real property) as the security for a loan.
verb
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(figuratively) To pledge and make liable; to make subject to obligation; to achieve an immediate result by paying for it in the long term.
verb
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Mortgage is a loan taken to purchase property and guaranteed by the same property.

An example of a mortgage is the loan you took out when you bought your house.

noun
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A loan for the purchase of real property, secured by a lien on the property.
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Origin of mortgage

  • Middle English morgage from Old French mort dead (from Vulgar Latin mortus) (from Latin mortuus) (past participle of morī to die mer- in Indo-European roots) gage pledge (of Germanic origin)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Anglo-Norman mortgage, Middle French mortgage, from Old French mort gage (“death pledge"), after a translation of judicial Medieval Latin mortuum vadium or mortuum wadium, from mortuum + vadium or wadium, of Germanic (Frankish) origin, from a root *waddi, wadja. Cf. gage and also wage.

    From Wiktionary