Momentum meaning

mō-mĕntəm
(physics) A quantity used to measure the motion of a body, equal to the product of the body's mass and its velocity.
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Momentum is defined as the amount of motion occurring in something that is moving, or the force that drives something forward to keep it moving.

An example of momentum is how quickly a car is moving down a hill.

An example of momentum is the encouragement of your parents, which keeps driving you forward and encouraging you to continue to succeed.

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The impetus of a moving object.
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Strength or force that keeps growing or building.

A campaign that gained momentum.

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The impetus of rising or falling prices.
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(philosophy) An essential or constituent element; a moment.
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(physics) (of a body in motion) The product of its mass and velocity.
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(physics, mech.) The product of the mass of a particle, body, etc. and its velocity.
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The impetus, either of a body in motion, or of an idea or course of events. (i.e: a moment)
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A measure of the rate of change in prices, instead of the actual price levels. Momentum is a tool used in technical analysis.
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A vector quantity that expresses the relation of the velocity of a body, wave, field, or other physical system, to its energy. The direction of the momentum of a single object indicates the direction of its motion. Momentum is a conserved quantity (it remains constant unless acted upon by an outside force), and is related by Noether's theorem to translational invariance . In classical mechanics, momentum is defined as mass times velocity. The theory of Special Relativity uses the concept of relativistic mass . The momentum of photons, which are massless, is equal to their energy divided by the speed of light. In quantum mechanics, momentum more generally refers to a mathematical operator applied to the wave equation describing a physical system and corresponding to an observable ; solutions to the equation using this operator provide the vector quantity traditionally called momentum. In all of these applications, momentum is sometimes called linear momentum.
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Origin of momentum

  • Latin mōmentum movement from movimentum from movēre to move meuə- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin momentum.

    From Wiktionary