Meat meaning

mēt
Meat is vulgar slang for a person’s body, in a strictly sexual view.

An example of meat is how a woman might describe her younger boyfriend.

noun
9
2
Something that one enjoys or excels in; a forte.

Tennis is his meat.

noun
5
3
The definition of meat is the inside of something or the part that has the most value or interest.

An example of meat is the edible part of a walnut.

An example of meat is the good part of a story.

noun
4
4
The edible flesh of animals, especially that of mammals as opposed to that of fish or poultry.
noun
3
2
Meat is defined as a food that comes from mammals, or hair-covered animals that feed their young milk.

An example of meat is a steak.

noun
3
3
Advertisement
Nourishment; food.
noun
1
0
The substance, meaning, or gist.

The meat of a story.

noun
1
0
(slang) A penis. [from 16th c.]
noun
1
0
(colloquial) The best or most substantial part of something. [from 16th c.]

We recruited him right from the meat of our competitor.

noun
1
0
The edible part, as of a piece of fruit or a nut.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The essence, substance, or gist.

The meat of the editorial.

noun
0
0
Food; esp., solid food, as distinguished from drink.
noun
0
0
The edible, inner part.

The meat of a nut.

noun
0
0
One's quarry.
noun
0
0
A meal, esp. dinner.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
The external genital organs.
noun
0
0
(now archaic, dialectal) Food, for animals or humans, especially solid food. See also meat and drink. [from 8th c.]
noun
0
0
(now rare) A type of food, a dish. [from 9th c.]
noun
0
0
(now archaic) A meal. [from 9th c.]
noun
0
0
(uncountable) The flesh of an animal used as food. [from 14th c.]

Is that meat halal to eat?

noun
0
0
Advertisement
(uncountable) Any relatively thick, solid part of a fruit, nut etc. [from 15th c.]

The apple looked fine on the outside, but the meat was not very firm.

noun
0
0
(countable) A type of meat, by anatomic position and provenance. [from 16th c.]

The butchery's profit rate on various meats varies greatly.

noun
0
0
(sports) The sweet spot of a bat or club (in cricket, golf, baseball etc.). [from 20th c.]

He hit it right on the meat of the bat.

noun
0
0

Throw it in here, meat.

noun
0
0
(Australian Aboriginal) A totem, or (by metonymy) a clan or clansman which uses it.
noun
0
0
Advertisement
meat and potatoes
  • The fundamental parts or part; the basis.
idiom
0
0
one's meat
  • Something that one especially enjoys or is skillful at.
idiom
0
0

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

Origin of meat

  • Middle English mete from Old English food

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English mete, from Old English mete (“meat, food"), from Proto-Germanic *matiz (“food"), from Proto-Indo-European *mad- (“to drip, ooze; grease, fat"). Cognate with Frisian mete, Old Saxon meti, Old High German maz (“food"), Old Icelandic matr, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐍄𐍃 (mats), from a Proto-Germanic *matiz. A -ja- derivation from the same base is found in Middle Dutch and Middle Low German met (“lean pork"), whence Modern Low German Mett (“minced meat") (whence 16th c. German Mettwurst (“a kind of sausage"))

    From Wiktionary

  • Old Irish mess (“animal feed") and Welsh mes (“acorns"), compare English mast (“fodder for swine and other animals"), are probably from the same root.

    From Wiktionary