Manifold meaning

mănə-fōld
Frequency:
Many and varied; of many kinds; multiple.

Our manifold failings.

adjective
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The definition of manifold is something that has many parts or facets.

An example of manifold used as an adjective is the phrase manifold reasons for poverty which refers to the many diverse and complex situtions which cause poverty.

adjective
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Having many features or forms.

Manifold intelligence.

adjective
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Being such for a variety of reasons.

A manifold traitor.

adjective
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(US, regional, in the plural) The third stomach of a ruminant animal, an omasum.
noun
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Consisting of or operating several devices of one kind at the same time.
adjective
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A whole composed of diverse elements.
noun
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A pipe or chamber having multiple apertures for making connections.
noun
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(mathematics) A topological space in which each point has a neighborhood that is equivalent to a neighborhood in Euclidean space. The surface of a sphere is a two-dimensional manifold because the neighborhood of each point is equivalent to a part of the plane.
noun
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To make several copies of, as with carbon paper.
verb
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To make manifold; multiply.
verb
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Having many and various forms, features, parts, etc.

Manifold wisdom.

adjective
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Of many sorts; many and varied; multifarious.

Manifold duties.

adjective
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Being such in many and various ways or for many reasons.

A manifold villain.

adjective
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Comprising, consisting of, or operating several units or parts of one kind.
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Something that is manifold.
noun
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A pipe with one inlet and several outlets or with one outlet and several inlets, for connecting with other pipes, specif., as in an automobile, for conducting exhausts from each cylinder into a single exhaust pipe.
noun
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To make manifold; multiply.
verb
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To make more than one copy of.

To manifold a letter with carbon paper.

verb
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A topological space or surface.
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(now historical) A copy made by the manifold writing process.
noun
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(mechanics) A pipe fitting or similar device that connects multiple inputs or outputs.
noun
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(mathematics) A topological space that looks locally like the "ordinary" Euclidean space and is Hausdorff.
noun
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The manifold meanings of the simple English word 'set' are infamous among dictionary makers.

adjective
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adjective
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adjective
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Exhibited at diverse times or in various ways.

C1384 ... the manyfold grace of God. "” I Petre 4:10 (Wycliffe's Bible)

1611 The manifold wisdom of God. "” Ephesians 3:10. (w:King James Bible)

adjective
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Many times; repeatedly.
adverb
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To make manifold; multiply.
verb
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(printing) To multiply or reproduce impressions of by a single operation.
verb
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(mathematics) A manifold of the specified number of dimensions.

N-manifold.

noun
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One of several copies.
noun
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Origin of manifold

  • Middle English from Old English manigfeald manig many many -feald, -fald -fold

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English, from Old English maniÄ¡feald (“manifold, various, varied, complicated, numerous, abundant, plural"), from Proto-Germanic *managaz (“many") + *-falþaz (“-fold"), equivalent to many +"Ž -fold. Cognate with Middle High German manecvalt (“manifold"), Icelandic margfaldr (“multiple"). Compare also German mannigfaltig (“various"), Dutch menigvoudig (“various"), Danish mangfoldig (“diverse"), Swedish mÃ¥ngfaldig (“multiple, manifold, diverse").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English manifolden, from Old English maniÄ¡fealdan (“to multiply, abound, increase, extend, reward"), equivalent to many +"Ž -fold. Cognate with Middle High German manecvalten, Icelandic margfalda (“to multiply"), Swedish mÃ¥ngfaldiga (“to manifold, reproduce").

    From Wiktionary