Mangle definition

mănggəl
A machine for pressing fabrics by means of heated rollers.
noun
4
2
Mangle is defined as to destroy by tearing, crushing or bruising.

An example of to mangle is to violently cut apart a wired fence.

verb
2
1
To ruin or spoil through ineptitude or ignorance.

Mangle a speech.

verb
2
1
The definition of a mangle is a machine with rollers which is used to press large smooth pieces of cloth.

An example of a mangle is a machine in a cleaners which is used to iron sheets.

noun
2
2
To mutilate or disfigure by battering, hacking, cutting, or tearing.

Fishing nets that mangle fish.

verb
2
2
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The mangle attached to wringer washing machines, often called the wringer.
noun
0
1
(chiefly british) A clothes wringer.
noun
0
2
To press with a mangle.
verb
0
2
To mutilate or disfigure by repeatedly and roughly cutting, tearing, hacking, or crushing; lacerate and bruise badly.
verb
0
2
To spoil; botch; mar; garble.

A translation that mangles the original text.

verb
0
2
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A machine for pressing and smoothing cloth, esp. sheets and other flat pieces, between heated rollers.
noun
0
2
To press in a mangle.
verb
0
2
verb
0
2
(archaic) To wring laundry.
verb
0
2
(computing) To modify (an identifier from source code) so as to produce a unique identifier for internal use by the compiler, etc.
verb
0
2
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A hand-operated device with rollers, for wringing laundry.
noun
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
mangle
Plural:
mangles

Origin of mangle

  • Middle English manglen from Anglo-Norman mangler frequentative of Old French mangoner to cut to bits possibly akin to mahaignier to maim mayhem

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Dutch mangel from German from Middle High German diminutive of mange mangonel from Late Latin manganum catapult mangonel

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English mangelen, from Anglo-Norman mangler, mahangler, frequentative of either Old French mangonner (“to cut to pieces") or mahaigner (“to mutilate"), of Germanic origin, for which see mayhem. Compare also Old High German mangolōn (“to suffer loss, be deprived") (> German mangeln (“to lack, mangle")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternate etymology derives mangle from Middle English *mankelen, a frequentative form of manken (“to mutilate"), from Old English mancian, bemancian (“to maim"). More at mank.

    From Wiktionary